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Complicating the Political Scientist as Blogger

  • Robert Farley (a1)
Abstract

In our efforts to make blogging an acceptable component of an academic career in political science, we ought not tame the practice of blogging beyond recognition. Multiple models exist under which blogging can contribute to the discipline of political science and through which political scientists can contribute to the public sphere.

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Copyright
References
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Bernstein, Jonathan. 2012. A Plain Blog about Politics. http://plainblogaboutpolitics.blogspot.com/.
Cosgrove, Mike. 2011. “Academic Publishing Rip-Offs, Part XVII?” Mike Cosgrove: Life, the Universe and Everything (blog). http://www.mikecosgrave.com/blog2006/?p=708.
Douglas, Donald. 2012. American Power (blog). http://americanpowerblog.blogspot.com/.
Drezner, Daniel. 2011. “Pssst…. wanna read about bridging the gap between theory and policy?” (blog) Foreign Policy. http://drezner.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2011/03/10/pssst_wanna_read_about_bridging_the_gap_between_theor_and_policy.
Farley, Robert. 2012. Lawyers, Guns and Money (blog). http://lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com.
Healy, Kieran. 2011. “Academic Journals and Copyright Control.” Orgtheory.net. http://orgtheory.wordpress.com/2011/05/19/academic-journals-and-copyright-control/.
Sides, John. 2011. “The Political Scientist as Blogger.” PS: Political Science and Politics 44(2): 267–71.
Tribble, Ivan. 2005. “Bloggers Need Not Apply.” Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/article/Bloggers-Need-Not-Apply/45022.
Walt, Stephen. 2010. “What to Do on Your Summer Vacation,” Foreign Policy. http://walt.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2010/12/07/what_to_do_on_your_summer_vacation.
The Week Editorial Staff. 2011. “John Sides and The Monkey Cage: Blogger of the Year,” The Week. http://theweek.com/article/index/215150/john-sides-and-the-monkey-cage-blogger-of-the-year.
Working Group on Evaluating Public History Scholarship. 2010. “Tenure, Promotion, and the Publicly Engaged Academic Historian.” http://ncph.org/cms/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/Engaged-Historian-Report-FINAL1.pdf.
Yglesias, Matthew. 2010. “If a Working Paper Falls in the Wilderness and a Journalist Hears About It, Is that Worse?” Thinkprogress: Yglesias. http://thinkprogress.org/yglesias/2010/09/03/198419/if-a-working-paper-falls-in-the-wilderness-and-a-journalist-hears-about-it-is-that-worse/.
Young, Jeremy C. 2010. “Blogging and Peer Review Revisited,” The Crolian Progressive. http://herbertcroly.wordpress.com/2010/04/30/blogging-and-peer-review-revisited/.
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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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