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The Cultural Orientation of Mass Political Opinion

  • John Gastil (a1), Don Braman (a2), Dan Kahan (a3) and Paul Slovic (a4)
Abstract

Most Americans lack any substantial degree of ideological sophistication (Kinder 1998), yet they often manage to express coherent views across a range of issues. The conventional explanation for this is that people rely on judgmental shortcuts (e.g., Sniderman, Brody, and Tetlock 1991). These “heuristics” permit individuals with sufficient political sophistication to sort and filter incoming messages to form relatively consistent views that align with preexisting values (Zaller 1992).

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Arthur Lupia . 2002. “Who Can Persuade Whom? Implications from the Nexus of Psychology and Rational Choice Theory.” In Thinking about Political Psychology, ed. James H. Kuklinski , 5188. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Paul M. Sniderman , Richard A. Brody , and Philip E. Tetlock . 1991. Reasoning and Choice: Explorations in Political Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

John R. Zaller 1992. The Nature and Origins of Mass Opinion. New York: Cambridge University Press.

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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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