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De-Democratization: The Case of Hungary in a Comparative Perspective

  • Adam Szymański (a1)
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References
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Bankúti, Miklós, Halmai, Gábor, and Scheppele, Kim Lane. 2012. “From Separation of Powers to a Government without Checks: Hungary’s Old and New Constitutions.” In Constitution for a Disunited Nation: On Hungary’s 2011 Fundamental Law, ed. Tóth, Gábor Atilla, 237–68. Budapest and New York: CEU Press.
Esen, Berk, and Gümüşçü, Şebnem. 2017. “A Small Yes for Presidentialism: The Turkish Constitutional Referendum of April 2017.” South European Society and Politics 22 (3): 303–26.
Ilonszki, Gabriella. 2007. “From Minimal to Subordinate: A Final Verdict? The Hungarian Parliament, 1990–2002.” The Journal of Legislative Studies 13 (1): 3858.
Mansfeldová, Zdenka. 2011. “Central European Parliaments over Two Decades–Diminishing Stability? Parliaments in Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Slovenia.” The Journal of Legislative Studies 17 (2): 128–46.
Pozsár-Szentmiklósy, Zoltán. 2017. “Supermajority in Parliamentary Systems–A Concept of Substantive Legislative Supermajority: Lessons from Hungary.” Hungarian Journal of Legal Studies 58 (3): 281–90.
Szymański, Adam. 2017. “De-Europeanization and De-Democratization in the EU and its Neighborhood.” Yearbook of the Institute of East-Central Europe 15 (2): 187211.
Zubek, Radoslaw. 2011. “Negative Agenda Control and Executive–Legislative Relations in East Central Europe, 1997–2008.” The Journal of Legislative Studies 17 (2): 172–92.
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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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