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    Johnson, Matthew 2016. COMMUNICATING POLITICS: USING ACTIVE LEARNING TO DEMONSTRATE THE VALUE OF THE DISCIPLINE. British Journal of Educational Studies, p. 1.


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    Eden, Sally 2014. Out of the comfort zone: enhancing work-based learning about employability through student reflection on work placements. Journal of Geography in Higher Education, Vol. 38, Issue. 2, p. 266.


    Leston-Bandeira, Cristina and Thompson, Louise 2013. Mind the Gap: Using UK Parliamentary Sources to Enhance Teaching. The Journal of Legislative Studies, Vol. 19, Issue. 3, p. 410.


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Embedding Transferable Skills and Enhancing Student Learning in a Political Science Research Methods Module: Evidence from the United Kingdom

  • Alistair Clark (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049096510002039
  • Published online: 14 January 2011
Abstract
Abstract

U.K. government policy is placing a heavy emphasis on “essential” and “employability” skills in an effort to help individuals cope with changing social and economic circumstances. Delivery of these skills falls to a range of education providers. This is a particular difficulty for university lecturers who teach non-vocational students who are increasingly concerned about their ability to compete in the job market after graduation. Transferable skills are therefore a key issue in student learning and support in U.K. political science, as well as other disciplines. Through assessment of one U.K.-based political science research methods module, this article suggests effective group-based ways of embedding such skills for political science students in a way that puts the student, and not the teacher, at the center of the learning process. These ideas are confirmed by survey evidence. In particular, student group research projects underline the idea that instructors should go beyond the classroom to help students apply theory. Importantly for both U.K.- and non-U.K.-based lecturers, the assertion can now also be extended to include transferable skills in addition to learning and applying theory.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

G. S. Bridges , J. L. Pershing , G. M. Gillmore , and K. A. Bates . 1998. “Teaching Quantitative Research Methods: A Quasi-Experimental Analysis.” Teaching Sociology 26 (1): 1428.

H. G. Levine , R. Gallimore , T. S. Weisner , and J. L. Turner . 1980. “Teaching Participant Observation Research Methods: A Skills-Building Approach.” Anthropology and Education Quarterly 11 (1): 3854.

M. Murtonen , and E. Lehtinen . 2003. “Difficulties Experienced by Education and Sociology Students in Quantitative Methods Courses.” Studies in Higher Education 28 (2): 171–85.

S. R. Takata , and W. Leiting . 1987. “Learning by Doing: The Teaching of Sociological Research Methods.” Teaching Sociology 15 (2): 144–50.

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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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