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Gender, Diversity, and Methods in Political Science: A Theory of Selection and Survival Biases

  • Shauna L. Shames (a1) and Tess Wise (a2)
Abstract

At a recent major political science conference, Tamara (not her real name) presented an in-depth qualitative study several years in the making, only to have the panelist speaking after her begin his remarks by saying, “And now back to the hard-core data.” By this, he meant quantitative, large-n data, which his work utilized. This moment highlights a series of tensions in our field relating to gender and methodology, and their effects, which this article explores and elucidates.

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Copyright
References
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