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Getting the Most from Classroom Simulations: Strategies for Maximizing Learning Outcomes

  • Timothy Wedig (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S104909651000079X
  • Published online: 01 June 2010
Abstract
Abstract

Classroom simulations can make a significant contribution to learning outcomes in political science courses, provided that they are firmly linked to course content and learning objectives. This article offers a step-by-step decision framework for instructors seeking to use simulations as a core component of their courses, including selection of an exercise, pre-simulation preparation, instructor role during a simulation, and techniques for debriefing after the exercise. Options such as online and face-to-face, synchronous and asynchronous, distributed and single classroom, and individual and team formats are compared, with a focus on their associated learning outcomes.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Victor Asal . 2005. “Playing Games with International Relations.” International Studies Perspectives 6: 359–73.

Victor Asal , and Beth Blake . 2006. “Creating Simulations for Political Science Education.” Journal of Political Science Education 2 (1): 118.

Marcus D. Childress , and Ray Braswell . 2006. “Using Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games for Online Learning.” Distance Education 27 (2): 187–96.

David Kember , and Doris Y. P. Leung . 2005. “The Influences of Active Learning Experiences on the Development of Graduate Capabilities.” Studies in Higher Education 30 (2): 155–70.

Joel Michael . 2006. “Where's the Evidence that Active Learning Works?Advances in Physiology Education 30: 159–67.

Chad Raymond . 2010. “Do Role-Playing Simulations Generate Measurable and Meaningful Outcomes? A Simulation's Effect on Exam Scores and Teaching Evaluations.” International Studies Perspectives 11 (1): 5160.

Brent E. Sasley 2010. “Teaching Students How to Fail: Simulations as Tools of Explanation.” International Studies Perspectives 11 (1): 6174.

Stephen Shellman , and Kürşad Turan . 2006. “Do Simulations Enhance Student Learning? An Empirical Evaluation of an IR Simulation.” Journal of Political Science Education 2 (1): 1932.

Janice D. Yoder , and Catherine M. Hochevar . 2005. “Encouraging Active Learning Can Improve Students' Performance on Examinations.” Teaching of Psychology 32 (2): 9195.

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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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