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Giving Up Control in the Classroom: Having Students Create and Carry Out Simulations in IR Courses

  • Elizabeth Frombgen (a1), David Babalola (a2), Aaron Beye (a3), Stacey Boyce (a4), Toby Flint (a5), Lucia Mancini (a6) and Katie Van Eaton (a7)...
Abstract

How can we make international relations real and meaningful for undergraduates? Because of my own frustration with this challenge, I tried a new way of teaching international relations. During the fall 2009 semester, the final exam for an upper-division course required the students to create and conduct a simulation to teach other students about international political institutions. I willingly gave up control of my classroom to the students!

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References
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Ambrosio, Thomas. 2004. “Bringing Ethnic Conflict into the Classroom: A Student-Centered Simulation of Multiethnic Politics.” PS: Political Science and Politics 37 (2): 285–89.
Dougherty, Beth K. 2003. “Byzantine Politics: Using Simulations to Make Sense of the Middle East.” PS: Political Science and Politics 36 (2): 239–44.
Franke, Volker. 2006. “The Meyerhoff Incident: Simulating Bioterrorism in National Security Class.” PS: Political Science and Politics 39 (1): 153–56.
Galatas, Steven E. 2006. “A Simulation of the Council of the European Union: Assessment of the Impact on Student Learning.” PS: Political Science and Politics 39 (1): 147–51.
Jefferson, Kurt W. 1999. “The Bosnian War Crimes Trial Simulation: Teachings Students about the Fuzziness of World Politics and International Law.” PS: Political Science and Politics 32 (3): 588–92.
Newmann, William W., and Twigg, Judyth L.. 2000. “Active Engagement of the Intro IR Student: A Simulation Approach.” PS: Political Science and Politics 33 (4): 835–42.
Shellman, Stephen M. 2001. “Active Learning in Comparative Politics: A Mock German Election and Coalition-Formation Simulation.” PS: Political Science and Politics 34 (4): 827–34.
Smith, Elizabeth T., and Boyer, Mark A.. 1996. “Designing In-Class Simulations.” PS: Political Science and Politics 29 (4): 690–94.
Switky, Bob. 2004. “Party Strategies and Electoral Systems: Simulating Coalition Governments.” PS: Political Science and Politics 37 (1): 101–04.
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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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