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Gradual Erosion of the Individual Mandate and the Shift to Majoritarianism in Poland

  • Monika Nalepa (a1)
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References
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Bermeo, Nancy Gina. 2003. Ordinary People in Extraordinary Times: The Citizenry and the Breakdown of Democracy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
Carey, John M. 2007. “Competing Principals, Political Institutions, and Party Unity in Legislative Voting.” American Journal of Political Science 51 (1): 92107.
Kitschelt, Herbert. 1995. “Formation of Party Cleavages in Post-Communist Democracies: Theoretical Propositions.” Party Politics 1 (4): 447–72.10.1177/1354068895001004002
Lijphart, Arend. 2012. Patterns of Democracy: Government Forms and Performance in Thirty-Six Countries. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
Nalepa, Monika. 2016. “Party Institutionalization and Legislative Organization: The Evolution of Agenda Power in the Polish Parliament.” Comparative Politics 48 (3): 353–72.
Nalepa, Monika. 2017. “Adapting Legislative Agenda-Setting Models to Parliamentary Regimes: Evidence from the Polish Parliament.” Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 50 (1): 181203.10.1515/slgr-2017-0024
Patty, John W. 2007. “The House Discharge Procedure and Majoritarian Politics.” Journal of Politics 69 (3): 678–88.
Rohde, David W. 1991. Parties and Leaders in the Post-Reform House. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Sadurski, Wojciech. 2018. “How Democracy Dies (in Poland): A Case Study of Anti-Constitutional Populist Backsliding.” Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 18/01. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3103491.
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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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