Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Teaching Large Classes with Clickers: Results from a Teaching Experiment in Comparative Politics

  • Marcela Velasco (a1) and Gamze Çavdar (a2)
Abstract
Abstract

Instant-response technologies, or clickers, are student response devices that help address some of the challenges involved in teaching large classes, namely student motivation and engagement with the material. This article evaluates a diverse set of teaching and learning strategies enabled by clicker technology and their impact on student learning. We highlight five aspects of teaching that are enhanced by the use of clickers, describe an experiment comparing student performance in traditional and clicker lectures, and report results of a survey of student perception about the effects of this technology on motivation, learning, and engagement. We argue that while the use of clickers is time-consuming for the instructor and presents a steep learning curve, clickers improve teaching effectiveness in large classes and hold promise for increasing student learning.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Teaching Large Classes with Clickers: Results from a Teaching Experiment in Comparative Politics
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Teaching Large Classes with Clickers: Results from a Teaching Experiment in Comparative Politics
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Teaching Large Classes with Clickers: Results from a Teaching Experiment in Comparative Politics
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Diane Bunce , Elizabeth Flens , and Kelly Neiles . 2010. “How Long Can Students Pay Attention in Class? A Study of Student Attention Decline Using Clickers.” Journal of Chemical Education 87 (1): 1438–443.

Danielle H. Dallaire 2011. “Effective Use of Personal Response ‘Clicker’ Systems.” Teaching of Psychology 38 (3): 199204.

Joelle Elicker , and Nicole McConnell . 2011. “Interactive Learning in the Classroom: Is Student Response Method Related to Performance?Teaching Psychology 38 (3): 147–50.

Heather Evans . 2012. “Making Politics “Click”: The Costs and Benefits of Using Clickers in an Introductory Political Science Course.” Journal of Political Science Education 8 (1): 8593.

Steven A. Greenlaw , and Stephen B. DeLoach . 2003. “Teaching Critical Thinking with Electronic Discussion.” The Journal of Economic Education 34 (1): 3652.

Angel Hoekstra . 2008. “Vibrant Student Voices: Exploring Effects of the Use of Clickers in Large College Courses.” Learning, Media and Technology 33 (4): 329–41.

Beth Morling , Meghan McAuliffe , Lawrence Cohen , and Thomas M. DiLorenzo . 2008. “Efficacy of Personal Response Systems (‘Clickers’) in Large, Introductory Psychology Classes.” Teaching of Psychology 35: 4550.

Kalyani Premkumar , and Cyril Coupal . 2008. “Rules of Engagement: 12 Tips for Successful Use of ‘Clickers’ in the Classroom.” Medical Teacher 30: 146–49.

Dennis Shaffer , and Michael Collura . 2009. “Evaluating the Effectiveness of Personal Response System in the Classroom.” Teaching of Psychology 36: 273–77.

Amy M. Shapiro , and Leamarie T. Gordon . 2012. “A Controlled Study of Clicker-Assisted Memory Enhancement in College Classrooms.” Applied Cognitive Psychology 26 (4): 635–43.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 6
Total number of PDF views: 44 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 200 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 24th September 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.