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What Is, and Isn’t, Causing Polarization in Modern State Legislatures

  • Seth Masket (a1)
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Crosson, Jesse. 2017. “Extreme Districts, Moderate Winners: Same-Party Competition in Washington and California’s Top-Two Primaries.” Paper presented at the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago. April 9.
Hopkins, Daniel J. 2018. The Increasingly United States: How and Why American Political Behavior Nationalized . Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Kirkland, Justin H. 2014. “Chamber Size Effects on the Collaborative Structure of Legislatures.” Legislative Studies Quarterly 39: 169–98.
La Raja, , Raymond, J., and Schaffner, Brian F.. 2015. Campaign Finance and Political Polarization: When Purists Prevail . Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Legislative Council of the Colorado General Assembly. 2002. “2002 Ballot Information Booklet.” In Secondary 2002 Ballot Information Booklet, ed Secondary. Denver: State of Colorado. Reprint.
Maestas, Cherie. 2000. “Professional Legislatures and Ambitious Politicians: Policy Responsiveness of State Institutions.” Legislative Studies Quarterly 25: 663–90.
Masket, Seth E. 2009. No Middle Ground: How Informal Party Organizations Control Nominations and Polarize Legislatures. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Masket, Seth. 2018. “How Colorado’s Unaffiliated Voted.” Vox.com. Available at www.vox.com/mischiefs-of-faction/2018/6/29/17509868/how-colorados-unaffiliated-voted.
Masket, Seth E., Winburn, Jonathan, and Wright, Gerald C.. 2012. “The Gerrymanderers Are Coming! Legislative Redistricting Won’t Affect Competition or Polarization Much, No Matter Who Does It.” PS: Political Science & Politics 45 (1): 3943.
McCarty, Nolan, Poole, Keith T., and Rosenthal, Howard. 2006. Polarized America: The Dance of Ideology and Unequal Riches. Boston: The MIT Press.
McCarty, Nolan, Rodden, Jonathan, Shor, Boris, Tausanovitch, Chris, and Warshaw, Christopher. 2018. “Geography, Uncertainty, and Polarization.” Political Science Research and Methods . doi:10.1017/psrm.2018.12.
McGhee, Eric, Masket, Seth, Shor, Boris, Rogers, Steven, and McCarty, Nolan. 2014. “A Primary Cause of Partisanship? Nomination Systems and Legislator Ideology.” American Journal of Political Science 58 (2): 337–51.
McGhee, Eric, and Shor, Boris. 2017. “Has the Top-Two Primary Elected More Moderates?Perspectives on Politics15 (4): 1053–66.
Norrander, Barbara, and Wendland, Jay. 2016. “Open Versus Closed Primaries and the Ideological Composition of Presidential Primary Electorates.” Electoral Studies 42: 229–36.
Shor, Boris. 2017. “Two Decades of Polarization in American State Legislatures.” Paper presented at the The Keith T. Poole Retrospective Conference, Athens, GA, May 25–26.
Shor, Boris. 2018. “Aggregate State Legislator Shor–McCarty Ideology Data, 2018 May Update.” Harvard Dataverse. https://doi.org/10.7910/DVN/BSLEFD
Snyder, James M. Jr., and Strömberg, David. 2010. “Press Coverage and Political Accountability.” Journal of Political Economy 118: 355408.
Voorheis, John and McCarty, Nolan and Shor, Boris. 2015. “Unequal Incomes, Ideology and Gridlock: How Rising Inequality Increases Political Polarization.” August 21. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2649215

What Is, and Isn’t, Causing Polarization in Modern State Legislatures

  • Seth Masket (a1)

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