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When Winning Is Really Losing: Teaching Awards and Women Political Science Faculty

  • Charity Butcher (a1) and Timothy Kersey (a2)
Abstract
ABSTRACT

Based on a recent survey of political science professors in the United States, women tend to win teaching awards at higher rates than their male counterparts. This may seem like good news for female faculty, particularly amid continuing reports of gender gaps in publications and citations as well as the “leaky pipeline” phenomenon within promotions. However, a closer look at these findings suggests that in cases in which such awards might be most beneficial to women, they are less likely than their male colleagues to receive such acknowledgments. In fact, women are more likely than men to receive these awards only in institutional contexts in which research output is more important for tenure and promotion than teaching. Thus, the achievement of teaching excellence may have an overall negative impact on the advancement of female faculty by reducing their time and focus available for research.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Mary Frank Fox . 1992. “Research, Teaching, and Publication Productivity: Mutuality versus Competition in Academia.” Sociology of Education 65 (4): 293305.

Kathleen J. Hancock , Matthew A. Baum , and Marijke Breuning . 2013. “Women and Pre-Tenure Scholarly Productivity in International Studies: An Investigation into the Leaky Career Pipeline.” International Studies Perspectives 14 (4): 507–27.

Kelly M Kadera . 2013. “The Social Underpinnings of Women’s Worth in the Study of World Politics: Culture, Leader Emergence, and Coauthorship.” International Studies Perspectives 14 (4): 463–75.

Daniel Maliniak , Ryan Powers , and Barbara F. Walter . 2013. “The Gender Citation Gap in International Relations.” International Organization 67 (4): 134.

Sara McLaughlin Mitchell , Samantha Lange , and Holly Brus . 2013. “Gendered Citation Patterns in International Relations Journals.” International Studies Perspectives 14 (4): 485–92.

Gudrun Østby , Håvard Strand , Ragnhild Nordås , and Nils Petter Gleditsch . 2013. “Gender Gap or Gender Bias in Peace Research? Publication Patterns and Citation Rates for Journal of Peace Research, 1983–2008.” International Studies Perspectives 14 (4): 493506.

Shelley Park . 1996. “Research, Teaching, and Service: Why Shouldn’t Women’s Work Count?Journal of Higher Education 67 (1): 4684.

Joey Sprague , and Kelly Massoni . 2005. “Student Evaluations and Gendered Expectations: What We Can’t Count Can Hurt Us.” Sex Roles 53 (11/12): 779–93.

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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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