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Women Also Know Stuff: Meta-Level Mentoring to Battle Gender Bias in Political Science

  • Emily Beaulieu (a1), Amber E. Boydstun (a2), Nadia E. Brown (a3), Kim Yi Dionne (a4), Andra Gillespie (a5), Samara Klar (a6), Yanna Krupnikov (a7), Melissa R. Michelson (a8), Kathleen Searles (a9) and Christina Wolbrecht (a10)...
Abstract
ABSTRACT

Women know stuff. Yet, all too often, they are underrepresented in political science meetings, syllabi, and editorial boards. To counter the implicit bias that leads to women’s underrepresentation, to ensure that women’s expertise is included and shared, and to improve the visibility of women in political science, in February 2016 we launched the “Women Also Know Stuff” initiative, which features a crowd-sourced website and an active Twitter feed. In this article, we share the origins of our project, the effect we are already having on media utilization of women experts, and plans for how to expand that success within the discipline of political science. We also share our personal reflections on the project.

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References
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American Political Science Association. 2004. “Women’s Advancement in Political Science: A Report of the APSA Workshop on the Advancement of Women in Academic Political Science in the United States.” Available at http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED495970.pdf. Accessed February 14, 2016.
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Greenwald Anthony G. and Krieger Linda Hamilton. 2006. “Implicit Bias: Scientific Foundations.” California Law Review 94 (4): 945–67.
Jones Hazel Morrow and Box-Steffensmeier Jan. 2014. “Implicit Bias and Why It Matters to the Field of Political Methodology.” The Political Methodologist. Available at http://thepoliticalmethodologist.com/2014/03/31/implicit-bias-and-why-it-matters-to-the-field-of-political-methodology.
Leslie Sarah-Jane, Cimpian Andrei, Meyer Meredith, and Freeland Edward. 2015. “Expectations of Brilliance Underlie Gender Distributions across Academic Disciplines.” Science 347 (6219): 262–5.
Maliniak Daniel, Powers Ryan M., and Walter Barbara F.. 2013. “The Gender Citation Gap in International Relations.” International Organization 67 (4): 889922.
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Mershon Carol and Walsh Denise. 2016. “Diversity in Political Science: Why It Matters and How to Get It.” Politics, Groups, and Identities 4 (3): 462–6.
Mitchell Sara McLaughlin, Lange Samantha, and Brus Holly. 2013. “Gendered Citation Patterns in International Relations Journals.” International Studies Perspectives 14 (4): 485–92.
National Science Foundation. 2013. “Survey of Earned Doctorates.” Available at www.nsf.gov/statistics/sed/2013/data/tab16.pdf. Accessed February 14, 2016.
Teele Dawn and Thelen Kathleen. 2017. “Gender in the Journals: Methodology, Coauthorship, and Publication Patterns in Political Science’s Flagship Journals.” PS: Political Science & Politics 50 (2): 433–47.
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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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