Skip to main content
×
Home

Women Don't Ask? Women Don't Say No? Bargaining and Service in the Political Science Profession

  • Sara McLaughlin Mitchell (a1) and Vicki L. Hesli (a2)
Abstract
Abstract

This article examines the dual problems of “women don't ask” and “women don't say no” in the academic profession. First, we consider whether female faculty bargain more or less frequently than male faculty about such resources as salary, research support, clerical support, moving expenses, and spousal accommodation. Analyzing a 2009 APSA survey, we find that women are more likely to ask for resources than men when considering most categories of bargaining issues. This finding goes against conventional wisdom in the literature on gender and bargaining that suggests that women are less likely to bargain than men. Second, we seek to understand if women are reluctant to say no when asked to provide service at the department, college, university, or disciplinary levels. We find that women are asked to provide more service and that they agree to serve more frequently than men. We also find that the service women provide is more typically “token” service, as women are less likely to be asked by their colleagues to serve as department chair, to chair committees, or to lead academic programs. The implications of these results for the leaky pipeline in the academic profession are discussed.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Women Don't Ask? Women Don't Say No? Bargaining and Service in the Political Science Profession
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Women Don't Ask? Women Don't Say No? Bargaining and Service in the Political Science Profession
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Women Don't Ask? Women Don't Say No? Bargaining and Service in the Political Science Profession
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
References
Hide All
Allen Henry L. 1998. “Faculty Workload and Productivity: Gender Comparisons.” In The NEA Almanac of Higher Education. Washington, DC: National Education Association.
Babcock Linda, Gelfand Michele, Small Deborah, and Stayn Heidi. 2006. “Gender Differences in the Propensity to Initiate Negotiations.” In Social Psychology and Economics, eds. Cremem D.D., Zeelendberg M., and Murnighan J.K., 239–59. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
Babcock Linda, and Laschever Sara. 2003. Women Don't Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
Bell Linda A. 2001. “Uncertain Times: The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession 2000–2001.” Academe 87 (2): 2598.
Bellas Marcia L., and Toutkoushian Robert K.. 1999. “Faculty Time Allocations and Research Productivity: Gender, Race and Family Effects.” The Review of Higher Education 22 (4): 367–90.
Blackaby David, Booth Allison L., and Frank Jeff. 2005. “Outside Offers and the Gender Pay Gap: Empirical Evidence from the UK Academic Labour Market.” The Economic Journal 115 (501): F81F107.
Bowles Hannah Riley, Babcock Linda, and Lai Lei. 2006. “Social Incentives for Gender Differences in the Propensity to Initiate Negotiations: Sometimes It Does Hurt to Ask.” Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 103 (1): 84103.
Breuning Marijke, Bredehoft Joseph, and Walton Eugene. 2005. “Promise and Performance: An Evaluation of Journals in International Relations.” International Studies Perspective 6 (4): 447–61.
Breuning Marijke, and Sanders Kathryn. 2007. “Gender and Journal Authorship in Eight Prestigious Political Science Journals.” PS: Political Science and Politics 40 (2): 347–51.
Chesterman Coleen, Ross-Smith Anne, and Peters Margaret. 2005. “Not Doable Jobs! Exploring Senior Women's Attitudes to Academic Leadership Roles.” Women's Studies International Forum 28 (2-3): 163–80.
Gerhart Barry. 1990. “Gender Differences in Current and Starting Salaries: The Role of Performance, College Major, and Job Title.” Industrial and Labor Relations Review 43 (4): 418–33.
Gerhart Barry, and Rynes Sara. 1991. “Determinants and Consequences of Salary Negotiations by Male and Female MBA Graduates.” Journal of Applied Psychology 76 (2): 256–62.
Greig Fiona. 2008. “Propensity to Negotiate and Career Advancement: Evidence from an Investment Bank that Women are on a ‘Slow’ Elevator.” Negotiation Journal 24 (4): 495508.
Henehan Marie T., and Sarkees Meredith Reid. 2009. “Open Doors and Closed Ceilings: Gender-Based Patterns and Attitudes in the International Studies Association.” International Studies Perspectives 10 (4): 428–46.
Hesli Vicki, and Burrell Barbara. 1995. “Faculty Rank Among Political Scientists and Reports on the Academic Environment: The Differential Impact of Gender on Observed Patterns.” PS: Political Science and Politics 28 (1): 101–11
Hesli Vicki L., DeLaat Jacqueline, Youde Jeremy, Mendez Jeanette, and Lee Sang-shin. 2006. “Success in Graduate School and After: Survey Results from the Midwest Region Part III.” PS: Political Science and Politics 39 (2): 317–25.
Hesli Vicki L., Fink Evelyn C., and Duffy Diane M.. 2003. “Mentoring in a Positive Graduate Student Experience: Survey Results from the Midwest Region, Part I.” PS: Political Science and Politics 36 (3): 457–60.
Hesli Vicki L., and Lee Jae Mook. 2011. “Faculty Research Productivity: Why Do Some of Our Colleagues Publish More than Others?PS: Political Science and Politics 44 (2): 393408.
Jacobs Jerry A. 2004. “The Faculty Time Divide.” Sociological Forum 19 (1): 327.
Jaschik Scott. 2005. “Gender Gap in Publishing.” Inside HigherEd (September 6).
Link Albert N., Swann Christopher A., and Bozeman Barry. 2008. “A Time Allocation Study of University Faculty.” Economics of Education Review 27 (4): 363–74.
Mathews A. Lanethea, and Andersen Kristi. 2001. “A Gender Gap in Publishing? Women's Representation in Edited Political Science Books.” PS: Political Science and Politics 34 (1): 143–47.
Milem Jeffrey F., Berger Joseph B., and Dey Eric L.. 2000. “Faculty Time Allocation: A Study of Change over Twenty Years.” The Journal of Higher Education 71 (4): 454–75.
Misra Joya, Lundquist Jennifer Hickes, Holmes Elissa, and Agiomavritis Stephanie. 2011. “The Ivory Ceiling of Service Work.” Academe Online. ⟨http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/pubsres/academe/2011/JF/Feat/misr.htm⟩.
Monroe Kristen, Ozyurt Saba, Wrigley Ted, and Alexander Amy. 2008. “Gender Equality in Academia: Bad News from the Trenches, and Some Possible Solutions.” Perspectives on Politics 6 (2): 215–33.
Park Shelley M. 1996. “Research, Teaching, and Service: Why Shouldn't Women's Work Count?The Journal of Higher Education 67 (1): 4684.
Perna Laura W. 2001. “Sex and Race Differences in Faculty Tenure and Promotion.” Research in Higher Education 42 (5): 541–67.
Porter Stephen R. 2007. “A Closer Look at Faculty Service: What Affects Participation on Committees? The Journal of Higher Education 78 (5): 523–41.
Rudman Laurie A. 1998. “Self-Promotion as a Risk Factor for Women: The Costs and Benefits of Counterstereotypical Impression Management.” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 74 (3): 629–45.
Russell Susan H., Fairweather James S., and Hendrickson Robert M.. 1991. Profiles of Faculty in Higher Education Institutions, 1988. Washington, DC: US Department of Education Office of Educational Research and Improvement. (NCES 91–389).
Sarkees Meredith Reid, and McGlen Nancy E.. 1999. “Misdirected Backlash: The Evolving Nature of Academia and the Status of Women in Political Science.” PS: Political Science and Politics 32 (1): 100–07.
Singell Larry D. Jr., Lillydahl Jane H., and Singell Larry D. Sr. 1996. “Will Changing Times Change the Allocation of Faculty Time?Journal of Human Resources 31 (2): 429–49.
Stegmaier Mary, Palmer Barbara, and van Assendelft Laura. 2011. “Getting on the Board: The Presence of Women in Political Science Journal Editorial Positions.” PS: Political Science and Politics 44 (4): 799804.
Toutkoushian Robert K. 1999. “The Status of Academic Women in the 1990s: No Longer Outsiders, but Not Yet Equals.” Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance 39 (5): 679–98.
Turk Theresa Guminski. 1981. “Women Faculty in Higher Education: Academic Administration and Governance in a State University System, 1966–1977.” Pacific Sociological Review 24 (2): 212–36.
Turner Caroline Sotello Viernes. 2002. “Women of Color in Academe: Living with Multiple Marginality.” Journal of Higher Education 73 (1): 7493.
Turner Caroline Sotello Viernes, and Myers Samuel L. 2002. Faculty of Color in Academe: Bittersweet Success. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
Twale Darla J., and Shannon David M.. 1996. “Professional Service Involvement of Leadership Faculty: An Assessment of Gender, Role, and Satisfaction.” Sex Roles 34 (1-2): 117–26.
Winslow Sarah. 2010. “Gender Inequality and Time Allocations among Academic Faculty.” Gender and Society 24 (6): 769–93.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 54
Total number of PDF views: 154 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 485 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 22nd November 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.