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    Le Bodo, Yann Paquette, Marie-Claude and De Wals, Philippe 2016. Taxing Soda for Public Health.


    Duchaine, Caroline and Diorio, Caroline 2014. Association between Intake of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration among Premenopausal Women. Nutrients, Vol. 6, Issue. 8, p. 2987.


    Vanderlee, Lana Manske, Steve Murnaghan, Donna Hanning, Rhona and Hammond, David 2014. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption Among a Subset of Canadian Youth. Journal of School Health, Vol. 84, Issue. 3, p. 168.


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Available energy from soft drinks: more than the sum of its parts

  • Anwar T Merchant (a1), Avnish Tripathi (a1) and Farhan Pervaiz (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S136898001000128X
  • Published online: 06 May 2010
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To evaluate the relationship between energy available from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and total energy availability.

Design

Ecological study using food availability data from 1976 to 2007 from the database of the Canadian Socio-Economic Information Management System. The average available total daily energy per capita (kJ (kcal)/d per capita) and percentage of energy from SSB (%E/d per capita) were calculated. A regression analysis was performed with average available total daily energy per capita (kJ (kcal)/d per capita) as the outcome and percentage of energy from SSB as the independent variable (%E/d per capita).

Setting

Canada 1976–2007.

Subjects

None.

Results

Between 1976 and 2007, total available energy increased on average by 669 kJ (160 kcal)/d per capita, and energy from SSB by 155 kJ (37 kcal)/d per capita. Total available energy increased by 434 kJ (104 kcal)/d per capita for a one unit increase in average percentage of energy from SSB.

Conclusions

Total available energy increased as the contribution of energy available from SSB increased. This increase was larger than that explained by energy availability from SSB alone. Reducing energy from soft drinks may contribute to larger reductions in total energy available for consumption.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email anwar.merchant@post.harvard.edu
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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