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Bringing home the right to food in Canada: challenges and possibilities for achieving food security

  • Karen Rideout (a1) (a2), Graham Riches (a3), Aleck Ostry (a2), Don Buckingham (a4) and Rod MacRae (a5)...
Abstract

We offer a critique of Canada's approach to domestic food security with respect to international agreements, justiciability and case law, the breakdown of the public safety net, the institutionalisation of charitable approaches to food insecurity, and the need for ‘joined-up’ food and nutrition policies. We examined Canada's commitments to the right to food, as well as Canadian policies, case law and social trends, in order to assess Canada's performance with respect to the human right to food. We found that while Canada has been a leader in signing international human rights agreements, including those relating to the right to food, domestic action has lagged and food insecurity increased. We provide recommendations for policy changes that could deal with complex issues of state accountability, social safety nets and vulnerable populations, and joined-up policy frameworks that could help realise the right to adequate food in Canada and other developed nations.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email: krideout@interchange.ubc.ca
References
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
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