Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Changes in consumption of food away from home and intakes of energy and other nutrients among US working-age adults, 2005–2014

  • Jessica E Todd (a1)
Abstract
Objective

To document changes in consumption of food away from home (FAFH) and intakes of selected nutrients by working-age adults between 2005–06 and 2013–14, covering the most recent recessionary period and recovery.

Design

Means were compared across survey rounds relative to 2005–06. Multivariate regression was used to account for changes in demographic characteristics over time.

Setting

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2005–2014.

Subjects

Working-age adults born in 1951–80 (n 12 129) and adolescents and young adults born in 1981–90 (n 5197) who reported day 1 dietary intake data.

Results

Approximately 34 % of energy consumed by working-age adults came from FAFH (14 % from fast foods) in 2005–06. Levels of FAFH consumption were lowest in 2009–10, at 28 and 11 % of energy from FAFH and fast foods, respectively. Percentage of energy from fast foods was 1·9 percentage points higher in 2013–14. Percentage of energy from saturated fat and total mg of cholesterol consumed were lower in 2009–14, while intake of fibre was higher in 2011–14. At-home foods had less saturated fat and more fibre in 2009–14. The greater the percentage of energy from FAFH in the day, the greater the intakes of fat and cholesterol. Percentage of energy from FAFH was highest among those born in 1981–90 and lowest among those born in 1951–60.

Conclusions

FAFH is a significant source of energy, fat and cholesterol among working-age adults. Menu labelling may lower FAFH’s energy content and make it easier for consumers to choose more healthful items.

Copyright
Corresponding author
* Corresponding author: Email jtodd@ers.usda.gov
References
Hide All
1. Kinsey, J (1983) Working wives and the marginal propensity to consume food away from home. Am J Agric Econ 65, 1019.
2. McCracken, VA & Brandt, JA (1987) Household consumption of food-away-from-home: total expenditure and by type of food facility. Am J Agric Econ 69, 274284.
3. Yen, ST (1993) Working wives and food away from home: the Box–Cox double hurdle model. Am J Agric Econ 75, 884895.
4. Jekanowski, MD, Binkley, JK & Eales, J (2001) Convenience, accessibility, and the demand for fast food. J Agric Resour Econ 26, 5874.
5. Lin, B-H & Guthrie, J (2012) Nutritional Quality of Food Prepared at Home and Away from Home, 1977–2008. Economic Information Bulletin no. EIB-105. Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
6. Guthrie, JF, Lin, B-H & Frazao, E (2002) Role of food prepared away from home in the American diet, 1977–78 versus 1994–96: changes and consequences. J Nutr Educ Behav 34, 140150.
7. Mancino, L, Todd, JE & Lin, B-H (2009) Separating what we eat from where: measuring the effect of food away from home on diet quality. Food Policy 34, 557562.
8. Beydoun, MA, Powell, LM & Wang, Y (2009) Reduced away-from-home food expenditure and better nutrition knowledge and belief can improve quality of dietary intake among US adults. Public Health Nutr 12, 369381.
9. US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (2016) Seasonal unemployment rate. https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS14000000 (accessed December 2016).
10. Todd, JE (2014) Changes in Eating Patterns and Diet Quality Among Working-Age Adults, 200510 . Economic Research Report no. ERR-161. Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
11. Ng, SW, Slining, MM & Popkin, BM (2014) Turning point for US diets? Recessionary effects or behavioral shifts in foods purchased and consumed. Am J Clin Nutr 99, 609616.
12. Hamrick, KS & Okrent, AM (2014) The Role of Time in Fast-Food Purchasing Behavior in the United States. Economic Research Report no. ERR-178. Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
13. US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (2016) Seasonal employment level. https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS12000000 (accessed December 2016).
14. Long, MW, Tobias, DK, Cradock, AL et al. (2015) Systematic review and meta-analysis of the impact of restaurant menu calorie labeling. Am J Public Health 105, e11e24.
15. Lesser, LI, Wu, L, Matthiessen, TB et al. (2017) Evaluating the healthiness of chain-restaurant menu items using crowdsourcing: a new method. Public Health Nutr 20, 1824.
16. DeNavas-Walt, C, Proctor, BD & Smith, JC (2010) Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009. Current Population Reports no. P60-238. Washington, DC: US Census Bureau.
17. DeNavas-Walt, C, Proctor, BD & Smith, JC (2012) Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011. Current Population Reports no. P60-243. Washington, DC: US Census Bureau.
18. DeNavas-Walt, Proctor BD & Smith, JC (2013) Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2012. Current Population Reports no. P60-245. Washington, DC: US Census Bureau.
19. Smith, JC & Medalia, C (2015) Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2014. Current Population Reports no. P60-253. Washington, DC: US Census Bureau.
20. Erlich, I & Becker, GS (1972) Market insurance, self-insurance, and self-protection. J Polit Econ 80, 623648.
21. Mancino, L & Kuchler, F (2009) Offsetting behavior in reducing high cholesterol: substitution of medication for diet and lifestyle changes. J Choice Model 2, 5164.
22. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2016) About the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm (accessed December 2016).
23. Dwyer, J, Picciano, MF, Daniel, JR et al. (2003) Collection of food and dietary supplement intake data: What We Eat in America – NHANES. J Nutr 133, issue 2, 590S600S.
24. Anand, J, Bodner-Montville, J, Ahuja, JK et al. (2011) What We Eat in America, NHANES 2007–2008: comparing day 1 and day 2 dietary data. FASEB J 25, 1 Suppl., 348.5.
25. US Census Bureau (2016) Historical Poverty Tables: People and Families – 1959 to 2015: Table 5. http://www.census.gov/data/tables/time-series/demo/income-poverty/historical-poverty-people.html (accessed December 2016).
26. Rahkovsky, I, Martinez, S & Kuchler, F (2012) New Food Choices Free of Trans Fats Better Align US Diets with Health Recommendations. Economic Information Bulletin no. EIB-95. Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
27. Otite, FO, Jacobson, MF, Dahmubed, A et al. (2013) Trends in trans fatty acids reformulations of US supermarket and brand-name foods from 2007 through 2011. Prev Chronic Dis 10, E85.
28. Wu, HW & Sturm, R (2013) What’s on the menu? A review of the energy and nutritional content of US chain restaurant menus. Public Health Nutr 16, 8796.
29. US Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration (2017) Menu Labeling Requirements. https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/ucm515020.htm (accessed May 2017).
30. Pew Research Center (2015) Modern Immigration Wave Brings 59 Million to US, Driving Population Growth and Change Through 2065. Views of Immigration’s Impact on US Society Mixed. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center.
31. Archer, E, Hand, GA & Blair, SN (2013) Validity of US nutritional surveillance: national health and nutrition examination survey caloric energy intake data, 1971–2010. PLoS One 8, e76632.
32. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2013) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2010 Data Documentation, Codebook, and Frequencies, Dietary Interview – Individual Foods, First Day (DR1IFF_F). https://wwwn.cdc.gov/Nchs/Nhanes/2009-2010/DR1IFF_F.htm (accessed November 2016).
33. Jackson, SL, King, SMC, Zhao, L et al. (2016) Prevalence of excess sodium intake in the United States – NHANES, 2009–2012. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 64, 13931397.
34. US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (2016) Food Pattern Equivalent Databases. https://www.ars.usda.gov/northeast-area/beltsville-md/beltsville-human-nutrition-research-center/food-surveys-research-group/docs/fped-databases/ (accessed May 2017).
35. US Department of Agriculture & US Department of Health and Human Services (2000) Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2000, 5th ed. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office.
36. US Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration (2017) Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label. https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/ucm385663.htm (accessed July 2017).
37. US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (2015) Food Expenditures. Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture; available at http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-expenditures.aspx
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 14
Total number of PDF views: 115 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 591 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 7th September 2017 - 17th August 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.