Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Designing and developing a literature-derived, population-based dietary inflammatory index

  • Nitin Shivappa (a1) (a2), Susan E Steck (a1) (a2), Thomas G Hurley (a1), James R Hussey (a2) and James R Hébert (a1) (a2)...
Abstract
Objective

To design and develop a literature-derived, population-based dietary inflammatory index (DII) to compare diverse populations on the inflammatory potential of their diets.

Design

Peer-reviewed primary research articles published through December 2010 on the effect of diet on inflammation were screened for possible inclusion in the DII scoring algorithm. Qualifying articles were scored according to whether each dietary parameter increased (+1), decreased (−1) or had no (0) effect on six inflammatory biomarkers: IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and C-reactive protein.

Setting

The Dietary Inflammatory Index Development Study was conducted in the Cancer Prevention and Control Program of the University of South Carolina in Columbia, SC, USA from 2011 to 2012.

Results

A total of ≈6500 articles published through December 2010 on the effect of dietary parameters on the six inflammatory markers were screened for inclusion in the DII scoring algorithm. Eleven food consumption data sets from countries around the world were identified that allowed individuals’ intakes to be expressed relative to the range of intakes of the forty-five food parameters observed across these diverse populations. Qualifying articles (n 1943) were read and scored based on the forty-five pro- and anti-inflammatory food parameters identified in the search. When fit to this composite global database, the DII score of the maximally pro-inflammatory diet was +7·98, the maximally anti-inflammatory DII score was −8·87 and the median was +0·23.

Conclusions

The DII reflects both a robust literature base and standardization of individual intakes to global referent values. The success of this first-of-a-kind attempt at relating intakes of inflammation-modulating foods relative to global norms sets the stage for use of the DII in a wide variety of epidemiological and clinical studies.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Designing and developing a literature-derived, population-based dietary inflammatory index
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Designing and developing a literature-derived, population-based dietary inflammatory index
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Designing and developing a literature-derived, population-based dietary inflammatory index
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email jhebert@sc.edu
References
Hide All
1. Pearson, TA, Mensah, GA, Alexander, RW et al. (2003) Markers of inflammation and cardiovascular disease: application to clinical and public health practice: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Heart Association. Circulation 107, 499511.
2. Keibel, A, Singh, V & Sharma, MC (2009) Inflammation, microenvironment, and the immune system in cancer progression. Curr Pharm Des 15, 19491955.
3. Terzic, J, Grivennikov, S, Karin, E et al. (2010) Inflammation and colon cancer. Gastroenterology 138, 21012114.
4. Galassetti, P (2012) Inflammation and oxidative stress in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Exp Diabetes Res 2012, 943706.
5. Wium-Andersen, MK, Orsted, DD, Nielsen, SF et al. (2013) Elevated C-reactive protein levels, psychological distress, and depression in 73,131 individuals. JAMA Psychiatry 70, 176184.
6. Killeen, K & Skora, E (2013) Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and clinical assessment of asthma in the adult. Nurs Clin North Am 48, 1123.
7. Cui, X, Jin, Y, Singh, UP et al. (2012) Suppression of DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by a juice concentrate: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Mol Nutr Food Res 56, 666670.
8. Cavicchia, PP, Steck, SE, Hurley, TG et al. (2009) A new dietary inflammatory index predicts interval changes in high-sensitivity c-reactive protein. J Nutr 139, 23652372.
9. Giugliano, D, Ceriello, A & Esposito, K (2006) The effects of diet on inflammation: emphasis on the metabolic syndrome. J Am Coll Cardiol 48, 677685.
10. Ockene, IS, Chiriboga, DE, Stanek, EJ 3rd et al. (2004) Seasonal variation in serum cholesterol levels: treatment implications and possible mechanisms. Arch Intern Med 164, 863870.
11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (2011) 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Hyattsville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/nhanes2007-2008/current_nhanes_07_08.htm
12. Abdul Wahab, AWM, Gharib, MK & Al-Sairafi, N et al. (2002) National Nutrition Survey for Adult Bahrainis Aged 19 Years and Above. Kingdom of Bahrain: Ministry of Health.
13. Barquera, S, Hernandez-Barrera, L, Campos-Nonato, I et al. (2009) Energy and nutrient consumption in adults: analysis of the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006. Salud Publica Mex 51, Suppl. 4(4), S562S573.
14. Chun, OK, Chung, SJ & Song, WO (2007) Estimated dietary flavonoid intake and major food sources of US adults. J Nutr 137, 12441252.
15. Ferrucci, LM, Daniel, CR, Kapur, K et al. (2010) Measurement of spices and seasonings in India: opportunities for cancer epidemiology and prevention. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 11, 16211629.
16. Ministry of Health (1999) Taking the Pulse: The 1996/97 New Zealand Health Survey. Wellington: Ministry of Health.
17. Henderson, L, Bates, CJ & Swan, G (2004) The National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Adults Aged 19 to 64 Years. vol. 5: Summary Report. London: Office for National Statistics.
18. Knudsen, VK, Gille, MB, Nielsen, TH et al. (2011) Relative validity of the pre-coded food diary used in the Danish National Survey of Diet and Physical Activity. Public Health Nutr 14, 21102116.
19. McLennan, W & Podger, A (1995) National Nutrition Survey: Selected Highlights, Australia, 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics Catalogue no. 4802.0. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service.
20. Nakamura, M, Tajima, S & Yoshiike, N (2002) Nutrient intake in Japanese adults – from the National Nutrition Survey, 1995–99. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo) 48, 433441.
21. Pan, W-H, Chang, Y-H, Chen, J-Y et al. (1999) Nutrition and health survey in Taiwan (NAHSIT) 1993–1996: dietary nutrient intakes assessed by 24-hour recall. Nutr Sci J 24, 1139.
22. Parnell, WR, Wilson, NC & Russell, DG (2001) Methodology of the 1997 New Zealand National Nutrition Survey. N Z Med J 114, 123126.
23. Shim, YJ & Paik, HY (2009) Reanalysis of 2007 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007 KNHANES) results by CAN-Pro 3·0 nutrient database. Korean J Nutr 42, 577595.
24. Energy Balance Study (2010) Why should I sign up? http://energybalance.sc.edu/signup.html (accessed May 2013).
25. Dragsted, LO, Strube, M & Leth, T (1997) Dietary levels of plant phenols and other non-nutritive components: could they prevent cancer? Eur J Cancer Prev 6, 522528.
26. International Coffee Organization (2011) Country datasheets. http://www.ico.org/profiles_e.asp (accessed May 2013).
27. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (2009) Per capita tea consumption. http://faostat3.fao.org/home/index.html#DOWNLOAD (accessed May 2013).
28. Hu, FB (2002) Dietary pattern analysis: a new direction in nutritional epidemiology. Curr Opin Lipidol 13, 39.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed