Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Effect of a pilot community intervention on fruit and vegetable intakes: use of FACET (Five-a-day Community Evaluation Tool)

  • PAL Ashfield-Watt (a1) (a2), AA Welch (a1), S Godward (a3) and SA Bingham (a4)

Abstract

Background

In 2001 the UK Department of Health funded pilot community-based interventions to improve fruit and vegetable intakes in five economically deprived areas of England. The effectiveness of the programme and the use of a brief tool for evaluating community interventions are reported here.

Methods

Data on intakes of and beliefs about fruit and vegetables were collected by a short postal questionnaire (FACET – Five-a-day Community Evaluation Tool) simultaneously from 810 individuals living in the pilot communities and 270 individuals who were participating in an unrelated observational study (controls). Data were collected before and after a 12-month intervention period. Quantitative dietary data derived from 7-day food diaries available for control subjects were used to assess the ability of the FACET questionnaire to estimate fruit and vegetable intakes.

Results

Compared with controls, the intervention group significantly increased their knowledge of the 5-a-day optimum (P < 0.01) and reported increased access to fruits and vegetables (P < 0.001). Overall, the intervention had no demonstrable effect on total fruit and vegetable intakes as measured by FACET. However, smoking habit strongly predicted change in fruit and vegetable intakes (P < 0.01) in the intervention group. Opposite trends were observed in the two groups, with ‘smokers’ and ‘non-smokers’ in the intervention and control groups respectively reducing their fruit and vegetable intakes. The FACET questionnaire agreed with food diary estimates of fruit and vegetable intakes in 56% of cases.

Conclusions

Community-based interventions can produce important changes in knowledge of and access to fruit and vegetables. However, in this study change in fruit and vegetable intakes was strongly influenced by smoking habit. This bias needs to be considered in planning future intervention and evaluation programmes. The FACET questionnaire provides acceptable estimates of fruit and vegetable intakes which may be used for grading intake in large community-based projects.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Effect of a pilot community intervention on fruit and vegetable intakes: use of FACET (Five-a-day Community Evaluation Tool)
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Effect of a pilot community intervention on fruit and vegetable intakes: use of FACET (Five-a-day Community Evaluation Tool)
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Effect of a pilot community intervention on fruit and vegetable intakes: use of FACET (Five-a-day Community Evaluation Tool)
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email p.ashfield-watt@massey.ac.nz

References

Hide All
1Khaw, KT, Bingham, S, Welch, A, Luben, R, Wareham, N, Oakes, S, et al. . Relation between plasma ascorbic acid and mortality in men and women in EPIC–Norfolk prospective study: a prospective population study. Lancet 2001; 357(9257): 657–63.
2Henderson, L, Gregory, J, Swan, G. The National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Adults aged 19 to 64 years. Types and Quantities of Food Consumed. London: The Stationery Office, 2002.
3Naska, A, Vasdekis, VGS, Trichopoulou, A, Friel, S, Leonhauser, IU, Moreiras, O, et al. . Fruit and vegetable availability among ten European countries: how does it compare with the ‘five-a-day’ recommendation? DAFNE I and II projects of the European Commission. British Journal of Nutrition 2000; 84(4): 549–56.
4Department of Health. Five a day Community Projects. London: The Stationery Office, 2001.
5Bingham, SA, Welch, AA, McTaggart, A, Mulligan, AA, Runswick, SA, Luben, R, et al. . Nutritional methods in the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer in Norfolk. Public Health Nutrition 2001; 4(3): 847–58.
6Cox, DN, Anderson, AS, Reynolds, J, McKellar, S, Mela, DJ, Lean, MEJ. Measuring fruit and vegetable intake: is five-a-day enough? European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1997; 51(3): 177–80.
7Welch, AA, McTaggart, A, Mulligan, AA, Luben, R, Walker, N, Khaw, KT, et al. . DINER (Data Into Nutrients for Epidemiological Research) – a new data-entry program for nutritional analysis in the EPIC–Norfolk cohort and the 7-day diary method. Public Health Nutrition 2001; 4(6): 1253–65.
8Efron, B, Tibshirani, R. Bootstrap methods for standard errors, confidence intervals and other measures of statistical accuracy. Statistical Science 1986; 1(1): 5475.
9Department of Social Services. Households Below Average Income 1999–2000. London: Department of Social Services, 2001.
10Cullum, A. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption: the 5 A DAY programme. Nutrition Bulletin 2003; 28: 159–63.
11Margetts, BM, Jackson, AA. Interactions between people's diet and their smoking habits: the dietary and nutritional survey of British adults. British Medical Journal 1993; 307(6916): 1381–4.
12Williams, C. Healthy eating: clarifying advice about fruit and vegetables. British Medical Journal 1995; 310(6992): 1453–5.

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Effect of a pilot community intervention on fruit and vegetable intakes: use of FACET (Five-a-day Community Evaluation Tool)

  • PAL Ashfield-Watt (a1) (a2), AA Welch (a1), S Godward (a3) and SA Bingham (a4)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.