Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Energy contribution of NOVA food groups and sociodemographic determinants of ultra-processed food consumption in the Mexican population

  • Joaquín A Marrón-Ponce (a1), Tania G Sánchez-Pimienta (a1), Maria Laura da Costa Louzada (a2) (a3) and Carolina Batis (a4)
Abstract
Objective

To identify the energy contributions of NOVA food groups in the Mexican diet and the associations between individual sociodemographic characteristics and the energy contribution of ultra-processed foods (UPF).

Design

We classified foods and beverages reported in a 24 h recall according to the NOVA food framework into: (i) unprocessed or minimally processed foods; (ii) processed culinary ingredients; (iii) processed foods; and (iv) UPF. We estimated the energy contribution of each food group and ran a multiple linear regression to identify the associations between sociodemographic characteristics and UPF energy contribution.

Setting

Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012.

Subjects

Individuals ≥1 years old (n 10 087).

Results

Unprocessed or minimally processed foods had the highest dietary energy contribution (54·0 % of energy), followed by UPF (29·8 %), processed culinary ingredients (10·2 %) and processed foods (6·0 %). The energy contribution of UPF was higher in: pre-school-aged children v. other age groups (3·8 to 12·5 percentage points difference (pp)); urban areas v. rural (5·6 pp); the Central and North regions v. the South (2·7 and 8·4 pp, respectively); medium and high socio-economic status v. low (4·5 pp, in both); and with higher head of household educational level v. without education (3·4 to 7·8 pp).

Conclusions

In 2012, about 30 % of energy in the Mexican diet came from UPF. Our results showed that younger ages, urbanization, living in the North region, high socio-economic status and high head of household educational level are sociodemographic factors related to higher consumption of UPF in Mexico.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Energy contribution of NOVA food groups and sociodemographic determinants of ultra-processed food consumption in the Mexican population
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Energy contribution of NOVA food groups and sociodemographic determinants of ultra-processed food consumption in the Mexican population
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Energy contribution of NOVA food groups and sociodemographic determinants of ultra-processed food consumption in the Mexican population
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
* Corresponding author: Email carolina.batis@insp.mx
References
Hide All
1. Ludwig, D (2011) Technology, diet, and the burden of chronic disease. JAMA 305, 13521353.
2. Crovetto, MM, Uauy, R, Martins, AP et al. (2014) Household availability of ready-to-consume food and drink products in Chile: impact on nutritional quality of the diet. Rev Med Chil 142, 850858.
3. Louzada, ML, Martins, AP, Canella, DS et al. (2015) Ultra-processed foods and the nutritional dietary profile in Brazil. Rev Saude Publica 49, 38.
4. Martínez Steele, E, Baraldi, LG, Louzada, ML et al. (2016) Ultra-processed foods and added sugars in the US diet: evidence from a nationally representative cross-sectional study. BMJ Open 6, e009892.
5. Moubarac, J-C, Batal, M, Louzada, ML et al. (2017) Consumption of ultra-processed foods predicts diet quality in Canada. Appetite 108, 512520.
6. Monteiro, CA, Levy, RB, Claro, RM et al. (2011) Increasing consumption of ultra-processed foods and likely impact on human health: evidence from Brazil. Public Health Nutr 14, 513.
7. Moubarac, J-C, Martins, AP, Claro, RM et al. (2013) Consumption of ultra-processed foods and likely impact on human health. Evidence from Canada. Public Health Nutr 16, 22402248.
8. Tavares, LF, Fonseca, SC, Garcia Rosa, ML et al. (2012) Relationship between ultra-processed foods and metabolic syndrome in adolescents from a Brazilian Family Doctor Program. Public Health Nutr 15, 8287.
9. von Ruesten, A, Feller, S, Bergmann, M et al. (2013) Diet and risk of chronic diseases: results from the first 8 years of follow-up in the EPIC-Potsdam study. Eur J Clin Nutr 67, 412419.
10. Fardet, A & Boirie, Y (2014) Associations between food and beverage groups and major diet-related chronic diseases: an exhaustive review of pooled/meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Nutr Rev 72, 741762.
11. Rauber, F, Campagnolo, PD, Hoffman, DJ et al. (2015) Consumption of ultra-processed food products and its effects on children’s lipid profiles: a longitudinal study. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 25, 116122.
12. Mendonca, R, de, C, Pimenta, AM, Gea, A et al. (2016) Ultra-processed food consumption and risk of overweight and obesity: the University of Navarra Follow-Up (SUN) cohort study. Am J Clin Nutr 104, 14331440.
13. Monteiro, CA, Cannon, G, Levy, RB et al. (2016) NOVA. The star shines bright. World Nutr 7, 2838.
14. Crovetto, M & Uauy, R (2012) Changes in processed food expenditure in the population of Metropolitan Santiago in the last twenty years. Rev Med Chil 140, 305312.
15. Martins, AP, Levy, RB, Claro, RM et al. (2013) Increased contribution of ultra-processed food products in the Brazilian diet (1987–2009). Rev Saude Publica 47, 656665.
16. Moubarac, J-C, Batal, M, Martins, AP et al. (2014) Processed and ultra-processed food products: consumption trends in Canada from 1938 to 2011. Can J Diet Pract Res 75, 1521.
17. Juul, F & Hemmingsson, E (2015) Trends in consumption of ultra-processed foods and obesity in Sweden between 1960 and 2010. Public Health Nutr 18, 30963107.
18. De Vogli, R, Kouvonen, A & Gimeno, D (2014) The influence of market deregulation on fast food consumption and body mass index: a cross-national time series analysis. Bull World Health Organ 92, 99107.
19. Monteiro, CA & Cannon, G (2012) The impact of transnational ‘Big Food’ companies on the South: a view from Brazil. PLoS Med 9, e1001252.
20. Longacre, M, Drake, K, MacKenzie, T et al. (2012) Fast-food environments and family fast-food intake in nonmetropolitan areas. Am J Prev Med 42, 579587.
21. Mallarino, C, Gomez, L & Gonzalez-Zapata, L (2013) Advertising of ultra-processed foods and beverages: children as a vulnerable population. Rev Saude Publica 47, 10061010.
22. Monteiro, CA, Moubarac, J-C, Cannon, G et al. (2013) Ultra-processed products are becoming dominant in the global food system. Obes Rev 14, Suppl. 2, 2128.
23. Pan American Health Organization (2015) Ultra-Processed Food and Drink Products in Latin America: Trends, Impact on Obesity, Policy Implications. Washington, DC: PAHO.
24. Gutiérrez, JP, Rivera-Dommarco, J, Shamah-Levy, T et al. (2012) National Health and Nutrition Survey. National Results. Cuernavaca: National Institute of Public Health.
25. Pan American Health Organization (2016) Pan American Health Organization Nutrient Profile Model. Washington, DC: PAHO.
26. Romero-Martínez, M, Shamah-Levy, T, Franco-Núñez, A et al. (2013) National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012: design and coverage. Salud Publica Mex 55, Suppl. 2, S332S340.
27. López-Olmedo, N, Carriquiry, AL, Rodríguez-Ramírez, S et al. (2016) Usual intake of added sugars and saturated fats is high while dietary fiber is low in Mexican population. J Nutr 146, issue 9, S1856S1865.
28. Vyas, S & Kumaranayake, L (2006) Constructing socio-economic status indices: how to use principal component analysis. Health Policy Plan 21, 459468.
29. Cediel, G, Reyes, M, Louzada, ML et al. (2017) Ultra-processed foods and added sugars in the Chilean diet (2010). Public Health Nutr (Epublication ahead of print version).
30. Moubarac, J-C, Claro, RM, Baraldi, LG et al. (2013) International differences in cost and consumption of ready-to-consume food and drink products: United Kingdom and Brazil, 2008–2009. Glob Public Health 8, 845856.
31. Bielemann, R, Santos Motta, J, Minten, G et al. (2015) Consumption of ultra-processed foods and their impact on the diet of young adults. Rev Saude Publica 49, 28.
32. Sparrenberger, K, Friedrich, R, Schiffner, M et al. (2015) Ultra-processed food consumption in children from a Basic Health Unit. J Pediatr (Rio J) 91, 535542.
33. Claro, RM, Maia, EG, Costa, BV et al. (2016) Food prices in Brazil: prefer cooking to ultra-processed foods. Cad Saude Publica 32, e00104715.
34. Steinfeldt, L, Anand, J & Murayi, T (2013) Food reporting patterns in the USDA Automated Multiple-Pass Method. Proc Food Sci 2, 145156.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed