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    Allman-Farinelli, Margaret Partridge, Stephanie R. and Roy, Rajshri 2016. Weight-Related Dietary Behaviors in Young Adults. Current Obesity Reports, Vol. 5, Issue. 1, p. 23.


    Bruening, Meg Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam Brewis, Alexandra Laska, Melissa Todd, Michael Hruschka, Daniel Schaefer, David R. Whisner, Corrie M. and Dunton, Genevieve 2016. Longitudinal social networks impacts on weight and weight-related behaviors assessed using mobile-based ecological momentary assessments: Study Protocols for the SPARC study. BMC Public Health, Vol. 16, Issue. 1,


    Pot, Gerda K. Almoosawi, Suzana and Stephen, Alison M. 2016. Meal irregularity and cardiometabolic consequences: results from observational and intervention studies. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, p. 1.


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How we eat what we eat: identifying meal routines and practices most strongly associated with healthy and unhealthy dietary factors among young adults

  • Melissa N Laska (a1), Mary O Hearst (a1) (a2), Katherine Lust (a3), Leslie A Lytle (a1) (a4) and Mary Story (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980014002717
  • Published online: 02 December 2014
Abstract
AbstractObjective

(i) To examine associations between young adults’ meal routines and practices (e.g. food preparation, meal skipping, eating on the run) and key dietary indicators (fruit/vegetable, fast-food and sugar-sweetened beverage intakes) and (ii) to develop indices of protective and risky meal practices most strongly associated with diet.

Design

Cross-sectional survey.

Setting

Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area, Minnesota (USA).

Subjects

A diverse sample of community college and public university students (n 1013).

Results

Meal routines and practices most strongly associated with healthy dietary patterns were related to home food preparation (i.e. preparing meals at home, preparing meals with vegetables) and meal regularity (i.e. routine consumption of evening meals and breakfast). In contrast, factors most strongly associated with poor dietary patterns included eating on the run, using media while eating and purchasing foods/beverages on campus. A Protective Factors Index, summing selected protective meal routines and practices, was positively associated with fruit/vegetable consumption and negatively associated with fast-food and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (P<0·001). A Risky Factors Index yielded significant, positive associations with fast-food and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (P<0·001). The probability test for the association between the Risky Factors Index and fruit/vegetable intake was P=0·05.

Conclusions

Meal routines and practices were significantly associated with young adults’ dietary patterns, suggesting that ways in which individuals structure mealtimes and contextual characteristics of eating likely influence food choice. Thus, in addition to considering specific food choices, it also may be important to consider the context of mealtimes in developing dietary messaging and guidelines.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email mnlaska@umn.edu
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Public Health Nutrition
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