Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 55
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Berg, Michael B. Lin, Linda Hollar, Sara M. Walker, Samantha N. and Erickson, Lauren E. 2016. The Relationship between Weight-Based Prejudice and Attitudes towards Obesity-Reducing Public Policies. Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy,


    Heard, Amy M. Harris, Jennifer L. Liu, Sai Schwartz, Marlene B. and Li, Xun 2016. Piloting an online grocery store simulation to assess children's food choices. Appetite, Vol. 96, p. 260.


    Huang, Christina Y Reisch, Lucia A Gwozdz, Wencke Molnár, Dénes Konstabel, Kenn Michels, Nathalie Tornaritis, Michalis Eiben, Gabriele Siani, Alfonso Fernández-Alvira, Juan M Ahrens, Wolfgang Pigeot, Iris and Lissner, Lauren 2016. Pester power and its consequences: do European children’s food purchasing requests relate to diet and weight outcomes?. Public Health Nutrition, p. 1.


    Hutchinson, Jeff Emerick, Jill and Saxena, Harshita 2016. The Future of Pediatric Obesity. Primary Care: Clinics in Office Practice, Vol. 43, Issue. 1, p. 1.


    Qendro, Athina-Evera 2016. Sustainable Agriculture and Food Supply.


    Vila-López, Natalia and Kuster-Boluda, Ines 2016. Adolescents’ food packaging perceptions. Does gender matter when weight control and health motivations are considered?. Food Quality and Preference, Vol. 52, p. 179.


    Vohra, Jyoti and Soni, Pavleen 2016. Understanding dimensionality of children’s food shopping behaviour in retail stores. British Food Journal, Vol. 118, Issue. 2, p. 450.


    Boelsen-Robinson, T. Backholer, K. and Peeters, A. 2015. Digital marketing of unhealthy foods to Australian children and adolescents. Health Promotion International,


    Harris, Jennifer L. LoDolce, Megan Dembek, Cathryn and Schwartz, Marlene B. 2015. Sweet promises: Candy advertising to children and implications for industry self-regulation. Appetite, Vol. 95, p. 585.


    Harris, Jennifer and Graff, Samantha 2015. The Childhood Obesity Epidemic.


    Harris, Jennifer L. LoDolce, Megan E. and Schwartz, Marlene B. 2015. Encouraging big food to do the right thing for children’s health: a case study on using research to improve marketing of sugary cereals. Critical Public Health, Vol. 25, Issue. 3, p. 320.


    Kelly, B. and King, L. 2015. Managing and Preventing Obesity.


    Kraak, V. I. and Story, M. 2015. An accountability evaluation for the industry's responsible use of brand mascots and licensed media characters to market a healthy diet to American children. Obesity Reviews, Vol. 16, Issue. 6, p. 433.


    Kraak, V. I. and Story, M. 2015. Influence of food companies' brand mascots and entertainment companies' cartoon media characters on children's diet and health: a systematic review and research needs. Obesity Reviews, Vol. 16, Issue. 2, p. 107.


    Nelson, Michelle R. Duff, Brittany R.L. and Ahn, Regina 2015. Visual perceptions of snack packages among preschool children. Young Consumers, Vol. 16, Issue. 4, p. 385.


    Qendro, Athina-Evera 2015. Albanian and UK Consumers’ Perceptions of Farmers’ Markets and Supermarkets as Outlets for Organic Food: An Exploratory Study. Sustainability, Vol. 7, Issue. 6, p. 6626.


    Vohra, Jyoti and Soni, Pavleen 2015. Logit modelling of food shopping behaviour of children in retail stores. Management Research Review, Vol. 38, Issue. 8, p. 840.


    Baldassarre, Fabrizio and Campo, Raffaele 2014. L'influenza del brand, del packaging e dei character sulle preferenze dei bambini: confronto tra ortofrutta e altri alimenti. MERCATI E COMPETITIVITÀ, Issue. 2, p. 129.


    Campbell, Norm Duhaney, Tara Arango, Manuel Ashley, Lisa A. Bacon, Simon L. Gelfer, Mark Kaczorowski, Janusz Mang, Eric Morris, Dorothy Nagpal, Seema Tsuyuki, Ross T. and Willis, Kevin J. 2014. Healthy Food Procurement Policy: An Important Intervention to Aid the Reduction in Chronic Noncommunicable Diseases. Canadian Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 30, Issue. 11, p. 1456.


    Danovitch, Judith H. and Mills, Candice M. 2014. How familiar characters influence children’s judgments about information and products. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, Vol. 128, p. 1.


    ×

Marketing foods to children and adolescents: licensed characters and other promotions on packaged foods in the supermarket

  • Jennifer L Harris (a1), Marlene B Schwartz (a1) and Kelly D Brownell (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980009991339
  • Published online: 01 September 2009
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To analyse cross-promotions targeted to children and adolescents on packaging in the supermarket.

Design

On three occasions from 2006 to 2008, researchers purchased all foods in a large supermarket that included a cross-promotion on the package. A total of 397 products were categorized by promotional partner, food category, targeted age group, promotion type, product nutrition, and company policies on marketing to children.

Results

The number of products with youth-oriented cross-promotions increased by 78 % during the period examined. Overall, 71 % of cross-promotions involved third-party licensed characters and 57 % appealed primarily to children under 12 years of age; however, the use of other forms of promotions increased from 5 % of the total in 2006 to 53 % in 2008, and promotions targeting pre-school and general audiences increased from 23 % to 54 % of the total. Only 18 % of products met accepted nutrition standards for foods sold to youth, and nutritional quality declined during the period examined. Food manufacturers with policies limiting marketing to children represented 65 % of all youth-oriented cross-promotions, their use of cross-promotions increased significantly, and the nutritional quality of their products did not improve. Some media companies did reduce the use of their properties on food promotions.

Conclusions

Overall, the supermarket environment worsened due to an increase in cross-promotions targeted to children and adolescents and a decline in the nutritional quality of these products. This analysis failed to find improvements in food marketing to youth and highlights the need to expand current industry self-regulatory pledges.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Marketing foods to children and adolescents: licensed characters and other promotions on packaged foods in the supermarket
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Marketing foods to children and adolescents: licensed characters and other promotions on packaged foods in the supermarket
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Marketing foods to children and adolescents: licensed characters and other promotions on packaged foods in the supermarket
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email Jennifer.harris@yale.edu
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

4.M Story & S French (2004) Food advertising and marketing directed at children and adolescents in the US. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 1, 3.

7.C Elliott (2008) Assessing ‘fun foods’: nutritional content and analysis of supermarket foods targeted at children. Obes Rev 9, 368377.

18.JL Harris , T Lobstein , JL Pomeranz & KD Brownell (2009) A crisis in the marketplace: how food marketing contributes to childhood obesity and what can be done. Annu Rev Public Health 30, 211225.

19.C Hawkes (2007) Regulating food marketing to young people worldwide: trends and policy drivers. Am J Public Health 97, 19621973.

21.P Wilde (2008) Self-regulation and the response to concerns about food and beverage marketing to children in the United States. Nutr Rev 67, 155166.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: