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Meat consumption trends and health: casting a wider risk assessment net

  • Anthony J McMichael (a1) and Hilary J Bambrick (a1)
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Abstract
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Corresponding author
*Email: tony.mcmichael@anu.edu.au
References
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1Popkin B. The nutrition transition in the developing world. Development Policy Review. 2003; 21: 581–97.
2Walker P, Rhubart-Berg P, McKenzie S, Kelling K, Lawrence RS. Public health implications of meat production and consumption. Public Health Nutrition. 2005; 8(4): 348–56.
3McMichael AJ. Planetary Overload: Global Environmental Change and the Health of the Human Species. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.
4Tilman D, Cassman K, Matson P, Naylor R, Polasky S. Agricultural sustainability and intensive production practices. Nature. 2002; 418: 671–7.
5Lang T, Heasman M. Food Wars. The Battle for Mouths, Minds and Markets. London: Earthscan, 2004.
6McMichael AJ. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy: its wider meaning for population health. British Medical Journal. 1996; 312: 1313–4.
7Bambrick H, Kjellstrom T. Good for your heart but bad for your baby? Revised guidelines for fish consumption in pregnancy. Medical Journal of Australia. 2004; 161: 61–2.
8Collignon PJ. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci and use of avoparcin in animal feed: is there a link?. Medical Journal of Australia. 1999; 171: 144–6.
9JETACAR. The Use of Antibiotics in Food-Producing Animals: Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Animals and Humans. Report of the Joint Expert Advisory Committee on Antibiotic Resistance (JETACAR). Canberra: Department of Health and Aged Care, 1999.
10Brown L. Learning from China: Why the Western Economic Model will not Work for the World [online], 2005. Available at www.earth-policy.org/Updates/2005/Update46.htm.
11McMichael AJ. Human Frontiers, Environments and Disease: Past Patterns, Uncertain Futures. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.
12 British Nutrition Foundation. n-3 Fatty Acids and Health. London: British Nutrition Foundation, 1999.
13Schmidt EB, Skou HA, Christensen JH, Dyerberg J. n – 3 Fatty acids from fish and coronary artery disease: implications for public health. Public Health Nutrition. 2000; 3: 91–8.
14Weiss RA, McMichael AJ. Social and environmental risk factors in the emergence of infectious diseases. Nature Medicine. 2004; 10(Suppl. 12) S70–6.
15Intergovermental Panel on Climate Change. Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Contribution of Working Group 1 to the Third Assessment Report. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001.
16McMichael AJ, Campbell-Lendrum DH, Kovats S, Edwards S, Wilkinson P, Wilson T, et al. Climate change. In: Ezzati M, Lopez A, Rodgers A, Mathers C, eds. Comparative Quantification of Health Risks: Global and Regional Burden of Disease due to Selected Major Risk Factors. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2004, 1543–649.
17Haines A, Patz JA. Health effects of climate change. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2004; 291: 99103.
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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