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Nutrition and health. The issue is not food, nor nutrients, so much as processing

  • Carlos A. Monteiro (a1)
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Abstract
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Corresponding author
Email: carlosam@usp.br
References
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1.World Health Organization (2003) Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases. Report of a Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation. WHO Technical Report Series no. 916. Geneva: WHO.
2.World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (2009) Policy and Action for Cancer Prevention. Food, Nutrition, and Physical Activity: A Global Perspective. Washington, DC: AICR.
3.Levy-Costa RB, Sichieri R, Pontes NS & Monteiro CA (2005) Household food availability in Brazil: distribution and trends (1974–2003). Rev Saude Publica 39, 530540.
4.Cavadini C, Siega-Riz AM & Popkin BM (2000) US adolescent’s food intake trends from 1965–1996. Arch Dis Child 83, 1824.
5.De Graaf C (2006) Effects of snacks on energy intake: an evolutionary perspective. Appetite 47, 1823.
6.Mattes R (2006) Fluid calories and energy balance: the good, the bad, and the uncertain. Physiol Behav 89, 6670.
7.Ludwig DS, Peterson KE & Gortmaker SL (2001) Relation between consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks and childhood obesity: a prospective, observational analysis. Lancet 357, 505508.
8.Cohen DA (2008) Obesity and the built environment: changes in environmental cues cause energy imbalances. Int J Obes (Lond) 32, S137S142.
9.Pollan M (2008) In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto. New York: The Penguin Press.
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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