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Plasma levels of six carotenoids in nine European countries: report from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

  • Wael K Al-Delaimy (a1), Anne Linda van Kappel, Pietro Ferrari (a1), Nadia Slimani (a1), Jean-Paul Steghens (a2), Sheila Bingham (a3), Ingegerd Johansson (a4), Peter Wallström (a5), Kim Overvad (a6), Anne Tjønneland (a7), Tim J Key (a8), Ailsa A Welch (a9), H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita (a10), Petra HM Peeters (a11), Heiner Boeing (a12), Jakob Linseisen, Françloise Clavel-Chapelon (a13), Catherine Guibout (a13), Carmen Navarro (a14), Jose Ramón Quirós (a15), Domenico Palli (a16), Egidio Celentano (a17), Antonia Trichopoulou (a18), Vassiliki Benetou (a18), Rudolf Kaaks (a1) and Elio Riboli (a1)...
Abstract
Background:

In addition to their possible direct biological effects, plasma carotenoids can be used as biochemical markers of fruit and vegetable consumption for identifying diet–disease associations in epidemiological studies. Few studies have compared levels of these carotenoids between countries in Europe.

Objective:

Our aim was to assess the variability of plasma carotenoid levels within the cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

Methods:

Plasma levels of six carotenoids – α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin – were measured cross-sectionally in 3043 study subjects from 16 regions in nine European countries. We investigated the relative influence of gender, season, age, body mass index (BMI), alcohol intake and smoking status on plasma levels of the carotenoids.

Results:

Mean plasma level of the sum of the six carotenoids varied twofold between regions (1.35μmoll−1 for men in Malmö, Sweden vs. 2.79μmoll−1 for men in Ragusa/Naples, Italy; 1.61μmoll−1 for women in The Netherlands vs. 3.52μmoll−1 in Ragusa/Naples, Italy). Mean levels of individual carotenoids varied up to fourfold (α-carotene: 0.06μmoll−1 for men in Murcia, Spain vs. 0.25μmoll−1 for vegetarian men living in the UK). In multivariate regression analyses, region was the most important predictor of total plasma carotenoid level (partial R2=27.3%), followed by BMI (partial R2=5.2%), gender (partial R2=2.7%) and smoking status (partial R2=2.8%). Females had higher total carotenoid levels than males across Europe.

Conclusions:

Plasma levels of carotenoids vary substantially between 16 different regions in Italy, Greece, Spain, France, Germany, the UK, Sweden, Denmark and The Netherlands. Compared with region of residence, the other demographic and lifestyle factors and laboratory measurements have limited predictive value for plasma carotenoid levels in Europe.

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*Corresponding author: Email Aldelaimy@iarc.fr
References
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