Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Self-reported advertising exposure to sugar-sweetened beverages among US youth

  • Gayathri Kumar (a1), Stephen Onufrak (a1), Deena Zytnick (a1), Beverly Kingsley (a1) and Sohyun Park (a1)...
Abstract
Objective

According to the Federal Trade Commission, in 2009, the top food category with teen-directed marketing expenditures was sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). The present study reports on exposure to SSB advertisements using self-report data from adolescents.

Design

Cross-sectional study design using descriptive statistics to assess self-reported frequency of exposure to SSB advertisements and multivariable logistic regression to examine associations between frequency of SSB advertising exposure and sociodemographic variables.

Setting

Online survey conducted at home.

Subjects

US adolescents aged 12–17 years (n 847).

Results

Among the surveyed adolescents, 42 % to 54 % reported seeing/hearing SSB advertisements ≥1 time/d. Those aged 14–15 years were more likely to report seeing/hearing soda, sports drink and energy drink advertisements ≥1 time/d than 16- to 17-year-olds. Males were more likely to report seeing/hearing sports drink advertising ≥1 time/d than females. Non-Hispanic black adolescents were more likely to report seeing/hearing fruit drink and sports drink advertisements ≥1 time/d than non-Hispanic white adolescents. Adolescents whose parents had high-school education or less were more likely to report seeing/hearing soda, fruit drink and energy drink advertisements ≥1 time/d than adolescents whose parents were college graduates.

Conclusions

Almost half of the adolescents sampled reported daily SSB advertising exposure, with higher exposure among African Americans and adolescents with less educated parents. These data can help inform potential actions that decision makers might take, such as education of adolescents and their caregivers on the potential impact of beverage advertising, especially among groups at higher risk for obesity.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Self-reported advertising exposure to sugar-sweetened beverages among US youth
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Self-reported advertising exposure to sugar-sweetened beverages among US youth
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Self-reported advertising exposure to sugar-sweetened beverages among US youth
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
* Corresponding author: Email wiz3@cdc.gov
References
Hide All
1. Powell, LM, Szczypka, G & Chaloupka, FJ (2007) Adolescent exposure to food advertising on television. Am J Prev Med 33, 4 Suppl, S251S256.
2. Federal Trade Commission (2013) A review of food marketing to children and adolescents: follow-up report. http://www.ftc.gov/os/2012/12/121221foodmarketingreport.pdf (accessed January 2014).
3. US Department of Agriculture & US Department of Health and Human Services (2010) Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, 7th ed. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office; available at http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2010/dietaryguidelines2010.pdf.
4. Yale Rudd, Center (2012) Trends in television food advertising to young people: 2011 update. http://www.yaleruddcenter.org/resources/upload/docs/what/reports/RuddReport_TVFoodAdvertising_5.12.pdf (accessed November 2012).
5. Wang, YC, Bleich, SN & Gortmaker, SL (2008) Increasing caloric contribution from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juices among US children and adolescents, 1988–2004. Pediatrics 121, e1604e1614.
6. Yale Rudd, Center (2010) Sugary drink f.a.c.t.s: Evaluating sugary drink nutrition and marketing to youth. http://www.sugarydrinkfacts.org/resources/SugaryDrinkFACTS_Report.pdf (accessed December 2012).
7. Kit, BK, Fakhouri, TH, Park, S et al. (2013) Trends in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among youth and adults in the United States: 1999–2010. Am J Clin Nutr 98, 180188.
8. US Census Bureau (2012) Current Population Survey: 2011. http://www.census.gov/acs/www/data_documentation/2011_release/ (accessed December 2012).
9. Ogden, CL, Kit, BK, Carroll, MD et al. (2011) Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States, 2005–2008. NCHS Data Brief no. 71. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db71.pdf (accessed June 2014).
10. Bleich, SN, Wang, YC, Wang, Y et al. (2009) Increasing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among US adults: 1988–1994 to 1999–2004. Am J Clin Nutr 89, 372381.
11. Kaiser Family Foundation (2010) Generation M2: Media in the lives of 8- to 18-year-olds. http://kff.org/other/event/generation-m2-media-in-the-lives-of/ (accessed January 2013).
12. Eisenmann, JC, Bartee, RT & Wang, MQ (2002) Physical activity, TV viewing, and weight in US youth: 1999 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Obes Res 10, 379385.
13. Park, S, Blanck, HM, Sherry, B et al. (2012) Factors associated with sugar-sweetened beverage intake among United States high school students. J Nutr 142, 306312.
14. Powell, LM, Szcypka, G, Chaloupka, JK et al. (2007) Nutritional content of television food advertisements seen by children and adolescents in the United States. Pediatrics 120, 576583.
15. Powell, LM, Szczypka, G & Chaloupka, FJ (2010) Trends in exposure to television food advertisements among children and adolescents in the United States. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 164, 794802.
16. Grier, SA & Kumanyika, SK (2008) The context of choice: health implications of targeted food and beverage marketing to African Americans. Am J Public Health 98, 16161629.
17. Henderson, VR & Kelly, B (2005) Food advertising in the age of obesity: content analysis of food advertising on general market and African American television. J Nutr Educ Behav 37, 191196.
18. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2011) Beverage consumption among high school students – United States, 2010. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 60, 778780.
19. African American Collaborative Obesity Research Network (2011) Impact of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on Black Americans’ health http://www.aacorn.org/uploads/files/AACORNSSBBrief2011.pdf (accessed February 2013).
20. Tandon, PS, Zhou, C, Sallis, JF et al. (2012) Home environment relationships with children’s physical activity, sedentary time, and screen time by socioeconomic status. In J Behav Nutr Phys Act 9, 88.
21. Harris, JL, Brownell, KD & Bargh, JA (2009) The food marketing defense model: integrating psychological research to protect youth and inform public policy. Soc Issues Policy Rev 3, 211271.
22. Collins, RL, Schell, T, Ellickson, PL et al. (2003) Predictors of beer advertising awareness among eighth graders. Addiction 98, 12971306.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score