Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Sexual dysfunction and the Mediterranean diet

  • Dario Giugliano (a1) (a2), Francesco Giugliano (a3) and Katherine Esposito (a1) (a2)
Abstract
Objectives

To discuss present knowledge about the relation between sexual dysfunction, metabolic factors and the Mediterranean-style diet.

Design

Review of the literature and personal perspectives.

Setting and results

Sexual problems appear to be widespread in society, influenced by both health-related and psychosocial factors, and are associated with impaired quality of life. Epidemiological studies suggest that modifiable health behaviours, including physical activity and leanness, are associated with a reduced risk for erectile dysfunction (ED) among men. Data from other surveys also indicate a higher prevalence of impotence in obese men. Obesity and the metabolic syndrome may be a risk factor for ED. The high prevalence of ED in patients with cardiovascular risk factors suggests that abnormalities of the vasodilator system of penile arteries play an important role in the pathophysiology of ED. We have shown that one-third of obese men with ED can regain their sexual activity after 2 years of adopting health behaviours, including a Mediterranean-style diet associated with regular exercise.

Conclusions

Western societies actually spend a huge part of their health care costs on chronic disease treatment and interventions for risk factors. The adoption of healthy lifestyles can reduce the prevalence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome, and hopefully the burden of sexual dysfunction.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Sexual dysfunction and the Mediterranean diet
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Sexual dysfunction and the Mediterranean diet
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Sexual dysfunction and the Mediterranean diet
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email dario.giugliano@unina2.it
References
Hide All
1Laumann, EO, Paik, A, Rosen, RC. Sexual dysfunction in the United States: prevalence and predictors. JAMA 1999; 281: 537–44.
2National Center for Chronic Prevention and Health Promotion. Defining Overweight and Obesity, Available at:www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/defining.htm . Accessed March 25, 2006.
3WHO. Obesity: Preventing and Managing the Global Epidemics. Geneva: World Health Organization, 1998.
4Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III). Executive Summary of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). JAMA 2001; 285: 2486–97.
5Ford, ES, Giles, WH, Dietz, WH. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among US adults: findings from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. JAMA 2002; 287: 356–9.
6Bacon, CG, Mittleman, MA, Kawachi, I, Giovannucci, E, Glasser, DB, Rimm, EB. Sexual function in men older than 50 years of age: results from the health professionals follow-up study. Annals of Internal Medicine 2003; 139: 161–8.
7Pinnock, CB, Stapleton, AM, Marshall, VR. Erectile dysfunction in the community: a prevalence study. The Medical Journal of Australia 1999; 171: 353–7.
8Chung, WS, Sohn, JH, Park, YY. Is obesity an underlying factor in erectile dysfunction? European Urology 1999; 36: 6870.
9Feldman, HA, Johannes, CB, Derby, CA, Kleinman, KP, Mohr, BA, Araujo, AB, et al. . Erectile dysfunction and coronary risk factors: prospective results from the Massachusetts male aging study. Preventive Medicine 2000; 30: 328–38.
10Fung, MM, Bettencourt, R, Barrett-Connor, H. Heart disease risk factors predict erectile dysfunction 25 years later. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 2004; 43: 1405–11.
11Seftel, AD, Sun, P, Swindle, R. The prevalence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus and depression in men with erectile dysfunction. The Journal of Urology 2004; 171: 2341–5.
12Celermajer, DS, Sorensen, KE, Bull, C, Robinson, J, Deanfield, JE. Endothelium-dependent dilation in the systemic arteries of asymptomatic subjects relates to coronary risk factors and their interactions. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 1994; 24: 1468–74.
13Esposito, K, Giugliano, F, Martedì, E, Feola, G, Marfella, R, D'Armiento, M, et al. . High proportions of erectile dysfunction in men with the metabolic sindrome. Diabetes Care 2005; 28: 1201–3.
14Kopelman, PG. Obesity as a medical problem. Nature 2000; 404: 635–43.
15Ziccardi, P, Nappo, F, Giugliano, G, Esposito, K, Marfella, R, Cioffi, M, et al. . Reduction of inflammatory cytokine concentrations and improvement of endothelial functions in obese women after weight loss over one year. Circulation 2002; 105: 804–9.
16Giugliano, F, Esposito, K, Di Palo, C, Ciotola, M, Giugliano, G, Marfella, R, et al. . Erectile dysfunction associates with endothelial dysfunction and raised proinflammatory cytokines levels in obese men. Journal of Endocrinological Investigation 2004; 27: 665–9.
17Saenz de Tejada, I, Goldstein, I, Azadzoi, K, Krane, RJ, Cohen, RA. Impaired neurogenic and endothelium-mediated relaxation of penile smooth muscle from diabetic men with impotence. The New England Journal of Medicine 1989; 320: 1025–30.
18Esposito, K, Giugliano, D. The metabolic syndrome and inflammation: association or causation? Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Disease 2004; 14: 228–32.
19Roberts, C, Vaziri, ND, Barnard, RJ. Effect of diet and exercise intervention on blood pressure, insulin, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide availability. Circulation 2002; 106: 2530–2.
20Billups, KL, Kaiser, DR, Kelly, AS, Wetterling, RA, Tsai, MY, Hanson, M, et al. . Relation of C-reactive protein and other cardiovascular risk factors to penile vascular disease in men with erectile dysfunction. International Journal of Impotence Research 2003; 15: 231–6.
21Sullivan, ME, Thompson, CS, Dashwood, MR, Khan, MA, Jeremy, JY, Morgan, RJ, et al. . Nitric oxide and penile erections: is erectile dysfunction another manifestation of vascular disease? Cardiovascular Research 1999; 43: 658–65.
22Esposito, K, Giugliano, F, Di Palo, C, Giugliano, G, Marfella, R, D'Andrea, F, et al. . Effect of lifestyle changes on erectile dysfunction in obese men: a randomized trial. JAMA 2004; 291: 2978–84.
23Derby, CA, Mohr, BA, Goldstein, I, Feldman, HA, Johannes, CB, McKinlay, JB. Modifiable risk factors and erectile dysfunction: can lifestyle changes modify risk? Urology 2000; 56: 302–6.
24Esposito, K, Giugliano, F, De Sio, M, Carleo, D, Di Palo, C, D'Armiento, M, et al. . Dietary factors in erectile dysfunction. International Journal of Impotence Research 2006; 18: 370–4.
25Eyre, H, Kahn, R, Robertson, RM. Preventing cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Circulation 2004; 109: 244–55.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed