Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Social, economic, health and environmental determinants of child nutritional status in three Central Asian Republics

  • Nolunkcwe J Bomela (a1)
Abstract
Objective

To investigate the comparative effect of social, economic, health and environmental characteristics on the nutritional status of children aged <3 years in Central Asia.

Design

Cross-sectional analysis using data from Demographic and Health Surveys.

Setting

Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan.

Subjects

Information on demographic health was gathered by Macro International Inc., Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan governments from a random sample of 14 067 households in the three countries. Anthropometric measurements were performed using standardized procedures on all children <3 years of age (n 2358). Only children with plausible Z-scores (n 1989) were selected for subsequent analyses.

Results

The main results indicated that country of residence, number of people in household, household wealth, birth weight, age of child, knowledge of oral rehydration therapy, maternal education, number of children <5 years of age and source of drinking water were strong predictors of child nutritional status in these countries. Furthermore, chronic malnutrition was most prevalent in all three countries but at varied levels. An unexpected finding was that fully vaccinated children were more likely to be malnourished than children who were partially vaccinated. A further unexpected finding was that breast-feeding especially in children >6 months old had a strong negative association with stunting and underweight.

Conclusions

In summary, the results from both the descriptive and binary logistic regression analysis are similar in terms of the explanatory variables and the statistical significance in the models.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Social, economic, health and environmental determinants of child nutritional status in three Central Asian Republics
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Social, economic, health and environmental determinants of child nutritional status in three Central Asian Republics
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Social, economic, health and environmental determinants of child nutritional status in three Central Asian Republics
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email Nolunkcwe.bomela@up.ac.za
References
Hide All
1.United Nations (2005) World Population Prospects. New York: UN.
2.United Nations (1992) The Progress of Nations. New York: UN.
3.Anderson, BA & Romani, JH (2001) Collective Individual Responsibility: Environment, Education, and Other Concerns in the Transition from Socialism in Russia. Population Studies Centre Research Report no. 01-477. Ann Arbor, MI: Population Studies Centre, University of Michigan.
4.UNICEF/World Health Organization (2004) The State of the World’s Children 2004. New York: UNICEF/WHO.
5.Bauer, A, Boschman, N, Green, D & Kuehnast, K (1998) A Generation at Risk: Children in the Central Asian Republics of Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. Manila: Asian Development Bank.
6.Falkingham, J (2000) From Security to Uncertainty: The Impact of Economic Change on Child Welfare in Central Asia. Innocenti Working Paper no. 76. New York: UNICEF.
7.Goskomstat/Ministry of Labour Council of Women Children and Demographic Problems (1995) The Current Situation of Women and Families in the Republic of Kazakhstan. Report for the IV World Conference of Women, Peking, September 1995. Almaty, Kazakhstan: Goskomstat/Ministry of Labour Council of Women Children and Demographic Problems.
8.Research Institute of Obstetrics and Paediatrics (1998) Kyrgyzstan Demographic and Health Survey (KRDHS 1997). Calverton, MD: Research Institute of Obstetrics and Paediatrics and Macro International Inc.
9.Academy of Preventive Medicine (2000) Kazakhstan Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS 1999). Calverton, MD: Academy of Preventive Medicine and Macro International Inc.
10.Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (1997) Uzbekistan Demographic and Health Survey (UZDHS 1996). Calverton, MD: Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Macro International Inc.
11.World Health Organization (1995) Physical Status: The Use and Interpretation of Anthropometry. Geneva: WHO.
12.Som, S, Pal, M, Bhattacharya, B, Bharah, S & Bharati, P (2006) Socio-economic differentials in nutritional status of children in the states of West Bengal and Assam India. J Biosoc Sci 38, 625642.
13.Yimer, G (2000) Malnutrition among children in southern Ethiopia: levels and risk factors. Ethiopian J Health Dev 14, 283292.
14.Rao, GR, Ladusing, L & Pritamjit, R (2004) Nutritional status of children in north east India. Asia Pac Popul J 19, issue 3, 3956.
15.Sasisaka, K, Waka, S, Kuroiwa, C, Cuadra, L, Aragon, MM & Hanada, K (2006) Nutritional status and associated factors in children aged 0–23 months in Granada Nicaragua. Public Health 120, 400411.
16.Sahn, DE (1994) The contribution of income to improved nutrition in Cote d’Ivoire. J Afr Econ 3, 2961.
17.Ndiaye, A (2002) Child malnutrition in Niger: an investigation of patterns of change (1992–1998). PhD Thesis, University of Arizona.
18.Ukwuani, FA & Suchindran, CM (2003) Implications of women’s work for child nutritional status in sub-Saharan Africa: a case study of Nigeria. Soc Sci Med 56, 21092121.
19.Silva, P (2005) Environmental Factors and Children’s Malnutrition in Ethiopia. World Bank Policy Research Working Paper no. 3489. Washington, DC: World Bank.
20.Rayhan, I & Khan, MSH (2006) Factors causing malnutrition among under five children in Bangladesh. Pak J Nutr 5, 558562.
21.Pongou, R, Majid, A & Salomon, EJ (2004) Assessing the Socioeconomic and Environmental Factors for Child Nutritional Status in Cameroon: A Multilevel Modelling. HCPDS Working Paper Series no. 14(4). Boston, MA: Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies.
22.Shrimpton, R, Victora, CG, Onis de, M, Lima, RC, Blossner, M & Clugston, G (2001) Worldwide timing of growth faltering: implications for nutritional interventions. Paediatrics 107, E75.
23.Aturupane, H, Deolalikar, AB & Gunewardena, D (2006) The Determinants of Child Weight and Height in Sri Lanka: A Quantile Regression Approach. New York: World Bank; available at http//eprints.lse.ac.uk/archive/00000718
24.Bhuiya, A & Streatfield, K (1990) Mother’s education and survival of female children in a rural area of Bangladesh. Popul Stud 45, 253264.
25.Boerma, JT, Sommerfelt, AE, Rutestin, SO & Rojas, G (1990) Immunization: Levels, Trends and Differentials. DHS Comparative Studies no. 1. Columbia, MD: Institute for Resources.
26.Mishra, VK & Retherford, RD (2000) Women’s education can improve child nutrition in India. Natl Fam Health Surv Bull issue 15, 14.
27.Delpeuch, F, Traissac, P, Martin-Prével, Y, Massamba, JP & Maire, B (2000) Economic crisis and malnutrition: socio-economic determinants anthropometric status of preschool children and their mothers in an African urban area. Public Health Nutr 3, 3947.
28.Choudhury, Y & Bhuiya, A (1993) Effects of biosocial variables on changes in nutritional status of rural Bangladeshi children pre- and post-monsoon flooding. J Biosoc Sci 25, 351357.
29.Sah, N (2004) Determinants of child malnutrition in Nepal: a case analysis from Dhanusha Central Terai Region of Nepal. J Nepal Health Res Council 2, issue 2, 5054.
30.Fedorov, L & Sahn, DE (2005) Socio-economic determinants of children’s health in Russia: a longitudinal study. Econ Dev Cult Change 53, 479500.
31.Thomas, D & Strauss, J (1992) Price Infrastructure household characteristics and child height. J Dev Econ 39, 301331.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed