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    Pomeranz, Jennifer L. and Chriqui, Jamie F. 2015. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 49, Issue. 3, p. 428.


    Nansel, Tonja R. Lipsky, Leah M. Eisenberg, Miriam H. Liu, Aiyi Mehta, Sanjeev N. and Laffel, Lori M.B. 2016. Can Families Eat Better Without Spending More? Improving Diet Quality Does Not Increase Diet Cost in a Randomized Clinical Trial among Youth with Type 1 Diabetes and Their Parents. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics,


    Leung, Cindy W. Ryan-Ibarra, Suzanne Linares, Amanda Induni, Marta Sugerman, Sharon Long, Michael W. Rimm, Eric B. and Willett, Walter C. 2015. Support for Policies to Improve the Nutritional Impact of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in California. American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 105, Issue. 8, p. 1576.


    Smith, Teresa M. Bertmann, Farryl M. W. Pinard, Courtney A. Schober, Daniel J. Shuval, Kerem Nguyen, Binh T. Fricke, Hollyanne E. and Yaroch, Amy L. 2016. Factors Associated With Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation Among the Working Poor: Findings From 2012 American Community Survey. Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition, p. 1.


    Laska, Melissa N. Caspi, Caitlin E. Pelletier, Jennifer E. Friebur, Robin and Harnack, Lisa J. 2015. Lack of Healthy Food in Small-Size to Mid-Size Retailers Participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Minneapolis–St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014. Preventing Chronic Disease, Vol. 12,


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Strategies to improve the dietary quality of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) beneficiaries: an assessment of stakeholder opinions

  • Susan J Blumenthal (a1), Elena E Hoffnagle (a2), Cindy W Leung (a3), Hayley Lofink (a4), Helen H Jensen (a5), Susan B Foerster (a6), Lilian WY Cheung (a7), Marion Nestle (a8) and Walter C Willett (a7) (a9)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980013002942
  • Published online: 08 November 2013
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To examine the opinions of stakeholders on strategies to improve dietary quality of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants.

Design

Participants answered a thirty-eight-item web-based survey assessing opinions and perceptions of SNAP and programme policy changes.

Setting

USA.

Subjects

Survey of 522 individuals with stakeholder interest in SNAP, conducted in October through December 2011.

Results

The top three barriers to improving dietary quality identified were: (i) unhealthy foods marketed in low-income communities; (ii) the high cost of healthy foods; and (iii) lifestyle challenges faced by low-income individuals. Many respondents (70 %) also disagreed that current SNAP benefit levels were adequate to maintain a healthy diet. Stakeholders believed that vouchers, coupons or monetary incentives for purchasing healthful foods might have the greatest potential for improving the diets of SNAP participants. Many respondents (78 %) agreed that sodas should not be eligible for purchases with SNAP benefits. More than half (55 %) believed retailers could easily implement such restrictions. A majority of respondents (58 %) agreed that stores should stock a minimum quantity of healthful foods in order to be certified as a SNAP retailer, and most respondents (83 %) believed that the US Department of Agriculture should collect data on the foods purchased with SNAP benefits.

Conclusions

Results suggest that there is broad stakeholder support for policies that align SNAP purchase eligibility with national public health goals of reducing food insecurity, improving nutrition and preventing obesity.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding authors: Email healthcommission@gmail.com and cindyleung@post.harvard.edu
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These authors contributed equally to this work.

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5.LM Dinour , D Bergen & MC Yeh (2007) The food insecurity–obesity paradox: a review of the literature and the role food stamps may play. J Am Diet Assoc 107, 19521961.

7.CW Leung , EL Ding , PJ Catalano et al. (2012) Dietary intake and dietary quality of low-income adults in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Am J Clin Nutr 96, 977988.

11.CW Leung , EE Hoffnagle , AC Lindsay et al. (2013) A qualitative study of diverse experts’ views about barriers and strategies to improve the diets and health of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) beneficiaries. J Acad Nutr Diet 113, 7076.

13.CW Leung , WC Willett & EL Ding (2012) Low-income supplemental nutrition assistance program participation is related to adiposity and metabolic risk factors. Am J Clin Nutr 95, 1724.

17.VS Malik , BM Popkin , GA Bray et al. (2010) Sugar-sweetened beverages and risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis. Diabetes Care 33, 24772483.

18.D Mozaffarian , T Hao , EB Rimm et al. (2011) Changes in diet and lifestyle and long-term weight gain in women and men. N Engl J Med 364, 23922404.

19.JC de Ruyter , MR Olthof , JC Seidell et al. (2012) A trial of sugar-free or sugar-sweetened beverages and body weight in children. N Engl J Med 367, 13971406.

20.CB Ebbeling , HA Feldman , VR Chomitz et al. (2012) A randomized trial of sugar-sweetened beverages and adolescent body weight. N Engl J Med 367, 14071416.

21.Q Qi , AY Chu , JH Kang et al. (2012) Sugar-sweetened beverages and genetic risk of obesity. N Engl J Med 367, 13871396.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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