Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Television food advertising to children: the extent and nature of exposure

  • Bridget Kelly (a1), Ben Smith (a1), Lesley King (a2), Victoria Flood (a3) and Adrian Bauman (a1)...
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To describe the pattern and prevalence of food and drink advertisements to children on commercial television in Sydney, Australia, and compare these with advertising regulations set out in the Children's Television Standards and results from a similar study in 2002.

Design

Data were collected by recording television from 06.00 hours until 23.00 hours on all three commercial channels from Sunday 14 May 2006 to Saturday 20 May 2006 (357 h). The study analysed advertisements in two children's viewing periods, one as defined in the 2002 study and the other according to current standards. Food advertisements were coded using 18 food categories and were analysed by time period and popular children's programmes.

Results

Food advertisements occurred in similar proportions during children's viewing hours and adult's viewing hours (25.5 vs. 26.9% of all advertisements, respectively), although there was a higher rate of high-fat/high-sugar food advertisements during children's viewing hours (49 vs. 39% of all food advertisements, P < 0.001). There were even more advertisements for high-fat/high-sugar foods during popular children's programmes, contributing to 65.9% of all food advertisements. Estimates of exposure indicate that children aged 5–12 years were exposed to 96 food advertisements, including 63 high-fat/high-sugar advertisements per week. Since 2002, there has been a reduction in overall food and high-fat/high-sugar food advertisements.

Conclusion

Despite reductions in overall levels of food advertising, children continue to experience high levels of exposure to food advertisements, which remain skewed towards unhealthy foods. Further food advertising regulation should be required to curtail the current levels of advertising of high-fat/high-sugar foods to children, to make them commensurate with recommended levels of consumption.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Television food advertising to children: the extent and nature of exposure
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Television food advertising to children: the extent and nature of exposure
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Television food advertising to children: the extent and nature of exposure
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email lking@health.usy.edu.au
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

1 S Chinn , RJ Rona . Prevalence and trends in overweight and obesity in three cross sectional studies of British children, 1974–94. British Medical Journal 2001; 322: 24–6.

2 RS Strauss , HA Pollack . Epidemic increase in childhood overweight, 1986–1998. Journal of the American Medical Association 2001; 286: 2845–8.

5 JL Wiecha , KE Peterson , DS Ludwig , J Kim , A Sobol , SL Gortmaker . When children eat what they watch. Impact of television viewing on dietary intake in youth. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine 2006; 160: 436–42.

6 JCG Halford , J Gillespie , V Brown , EE Pontin , TM Dovey . Effect of television advertisements for foods on food consumption in children. Appetite 2004; 42: 221–5.

9 T Lobstein , S Dibb . Evidence of a possible link between obesogenic food advertising and child overweight. The International Association for the Study of Obesity. Obesity Reviews 2005; 6: 203–8.

11 AC Bell , PJ Kremer , AM Magarey , BA Swinburn . Contribution of ‘noncore’ foods and beverages to the energy intake and weight status of Australian children. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2005; 59: 639–45.

12 N Wilson , L Signal , S Nicholls , G Thomson . Marketing fat and sugar to children on New Zealand television. Preventive Medicine 2006; 42: 96101.

18 L Neville , M Thomas , A Bauman . Food advertising on Australian television: the extent of children's exposure. Health Promotion International 2005; 20: 105–12.

20 HD Rodd , V Patel . Content analysis of children's television advertising in relation to dental health. British Dental Journal 2005; 199: 710–3.

21 K Kotz , M Story . Food advertisements during children's Saturday morning television programming: are they consistent with dietary recommendations? Journal of the American Dietetic Association 1994; 94: 1296–300.

22 K Chapman , P Nicholas , R Supramaniam . How much food advertising is there on Australian television? Health Promotion International 2006; 21: 172–80.

25 MM Mello , DM Studdert , TA Brennan . Health policy report. Obesity – the new frontier of public health law. New England Journal of Medicine 2006; 354: 2601–10.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 91
Total number of PDF views: 809 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 811 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 20th September 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.