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Testing nutrient profile models using data from a survey of nutrition professionals

  • Peter Scarborough (a1), Anna Boxer (a1), Mike Rayner (a1) and Lynn Stockley (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980007666671
  • Published online: 01 April 2007
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To compare nutrient profile models with a standard ranking of 120 foods.

Design

Over 700 nutrition professionals were asked to categorise 120 foods into one of six positions on the basis of their healthiness. These categorisations were used to produce a standard ranking of the 120 foods. The standard ranking was compared with the results of applying eight different nutrient profile models to the 120 foods: Models SSCg3d and WXYfm developed for the UK Food Standards Agency, the Nutritious Food Index, the Ratio of Recommended to Restricted nutrients, the Naturally Nutrient Rich score, the Australian Heart Foundation's Tick scheme, the American Heart Association's heart-check mark and the Netherlands tripartite classification model for foods. Rank correlation was assessed for continuous models, and dependence was assessed for categorical models.

Results

The continuous models each showed good correlation with the standard ranking (Spearman's ρ = 0.6–0.8). The categorical models achieved high χ2 results, indicating a high level of dependence between the nutrition professionals' and the models' categorisations (P < 0.001). Models SSCg3d and WXYfm achieved higher scores than the other models, implying a greater agreement with the standard ranking of foods.

Conclusions

The results suggest that Models SSCg3d and WXYfm rank and categorise foods in accordance with the views of nutrition professionals.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email peter.scarborough@dphpc.ox.ac.uk
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

1P Scarborough , M Rayner , L Stockley . Developing nutrient profile models: a systematic approach. Public Health Nutrition 2007; in press.

5P Scarborough , M Rayner , L Stockley , A Black . Nutrition professionals' perception of the ‘healthiness’ of individual foods. Public Health Nutrition 2007; in press.

7DM Scheidt , E Daniel . Composite index for aggregating nutrient density using food labels: ratio of recommended to restricted food components. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 2004; 36(1): 35–9.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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