Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Unsaturated fat intakes and mental health outcomes in young women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Heath

  • Clare Daley (a1), Amanda Patterson (a1), David Sibbritt (a2) and Lesley MacDonald-Wicks (a1)
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To determine if associations exist between a range of unsaturated fatty acid intakes and mental health outcomes.

Design

Cross-sectional data analysis of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH) Young Cohort Survey 3 that included the validated seventy-four-item Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies FFQ, validated mental health scales and self-report questions on depression and anxiety.

Setting

Australia, 2003.

Subjects

A nationally representative sample of young Australian women (25–30 years) from ALSWH. The 7635 women with plausible energy intakes (>4·5 but <20·0 MJ/d) were included in the analyses.

Results

Adjusted logistic regression analyses found statistically significant associations between higher intakes of α-linolenic acid and decreased likelihood of depressive symptoms indicated by the ten-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESD-10; OR=0·77; 95 % CI 0·60, 0·99; P=0·040) and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) mental health subscale (OR=0·73 95 % CI 0·56, 0·96; P=0·024). Furthermore, higher intakes of n-6 fatty acids (OR=0·96, 95 % CI 0·93, 0·99; P=0·019) and linoleic acid (OR=0·96, 95 % CI 0·93, 0·99; P=0·020) were associated with decreased likelihood of self-reported diagnosed anxiety and higher intakes of n-9 fatty acids (OR=1·02, 95 % CI 1·00, 1·04; P=0·041) and oleic acid (OR=1·02, 95 % CI 1·00, 1·05; P=0·046) were associated with increased likelihood of self-reported diagnosed anxiety.

Conclusions:

Increased intakes of α-linolenic acid were associated with a reduced likelihood of depressive symptoms, increased intakes of n-6 fatty acids and linoleic acid were associated with a reduced likelihood of self-reported anxiety, and increased intakes of n-9 fatty acids and oleic acid were associated with an increased likelihood of anxiety. Additional studies are needed to further elucidate associations between unsaturated fatty acids and depression and anxiety.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Unsaturated fat intakes and mental health outcomes in young women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Heath
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Unsaturated fat intakes and mental health outcomes in young women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Heath
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Unsaturated fat intakes and mental health outcomes in young women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Heath
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email Lesley.Wicks@newcastle.edu.au
References
Hide All
1.World Health Organization (WHO) (2003) Investing in Mental Health. Geneva: WHO, Department of Mental Health and Substance Dependence.
2.Slade T, Johnston A, Teesson M et al. (2009) The Mental Health of Australians 2: Report on the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. Canberra: Department of Health and Ageing.
3.Australian Insitute of Health and Welfare (2008) Australia's Health 2008. Canberra: AIHW.
4.Klerman G & Weissman M (1989) Increasing rates of depression. JAMA 261, 22292235.
5.Drewnowski A & Popkin B (1997) The nutrition transition: new trends in the global diet. Nutr Rev 55, 3143.
6.Hibbeln J & Salem Jr N (1995) Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids and depression: when cholesterol does not satisfy. Am J Clin Nutr 62, 19.
7.Hidaka B (2012) Depression as a disease of modernity: explanations for increasing prevalence. J Affect Disord 140, 205214.
8.Goldney D, Eckert K, Hawthorne G et al. (2010) Changes in the prevalence of major depression in an Australian community. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 44, 901910.
9.Wainwright P (2002) Dietary essential fatty acids and brain function: a developmental perspective on mechanisms. Proc Nutr Soc 61, 6169.
10.Jumpsen J & Clandinin MT (1995) Brain Development: Relationship to Dietary Lipid and Lipid Metabolism. Champaign, IL: AOCS Press.
11.Australian National and Health Medical Research Council (2006) Nutrient Reference Values for Australia and New Zealand Including Recommended Dietary Intakes. Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia.
12.Appleton K, Rogers P & Ness A (2010) Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on depressed mood. Am J Clin Nutr 91, 757770.
13.Yanfeng L, Qi D, Ekperi L et al. (2011) Fish consumption and severely depressed mood, findings from the first national nutrition follow-up study. Psychiatry Res 190, 103109.
14.Colango L, Whooley M, Daviglus M et al. (2009) Higher dietary intake of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is inversely associated with depressive symptoms in women. Nutrition 25, 10111019.
15.Tanskanen A, Hibbeln J, Tuomilehto J et al. (2001) Fish consumption and depressive symptoms in the general population in Finland. Psychiatr Serv 52, 529531.
16.Crowe F, Skeaff M, Green T et al. (2007) Serum phospholipid n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and physical and mental health in a population-based survey of New Zealand adolescents and adults. Am J Clin Nutr 86, 12781285.
17.Ross B (2009) Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and anxiety disorders. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 81, 309312.
18.Sanchez-Villegas A, Henriquez P, Figueiras A et al. (2007) Long chain omega-3 fatty acids intake, fish consumption and mental disorders in the SUN cohort study. Eur J Nutr 46, 337346.
19.Wolfe A, Ogbonna E, Lim S et al. (2009) Dietary linoleic and oleic fatty acids in relation to severe depressed mood: 10 years follow-up of a national cohort. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 33, 972977.
20.Yary T & Aazami S (2011) The association between polyunsaturated fatty acids and depression among Iranian postgraduate students in Malaysia. Lipids Health Dis 10, 151.
21.Lee C, Dobson A, Brown W et al. (2005) Cohort profile: the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. Int J Epidemiol 34, 987991.
22.Brown W, Bryson L, Byles J et al. (1996) Women’s health Australia: establishment of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. J Womens Health 5, 467472.
23.Brown W, Bryson L, Byles J et al. (1998) Women’s Health Australia: recruitment for a national longitudinal cohort study. Womens Health 28, 2340.
24.University of Newcastle & University of Queensland (2012) Women’s Health Australia. www.alswh.org.au/
25.Giles G & Ireland P (1996) Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies (version 2). Melbourne: The Cancer Council Victoria.
26.Hodge A, Patterson A, Brown W et al. (2000) The Anti Cancer Council of Victoria FFQ: relative validity of nutrient intakes compared with weighed food records in young to middle-aged women in a study of iron supplementation. Aust N Z J Public Health 24, 576583.
27.Williams C & Burdge G (2006) Long-chain n-3 PUFA: plant v. marine sources. Proc Nutr Soc 65, 4250.
28.Howe P, Meyer B, Record S et al. (2006) Dietary intake of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: contribution of meat sources. Nutrition 22, 4753.
29.Roberts R & Vernon S (1983) The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: its use in a community sample. Am J Psychiatry 140, 4146.
30.Boey K (1999) Cross validation of a short form of the CESD-10 in Chinese elderly. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 14, 608617.
31.Mishra G & Schofield M (1998) Norms for the physical and mental health component summary scores of the SF-36 for young, middle-aged and older Australian women. Qual Life Res 7, 215220.
32.McCallum J (1995) The SF-36 in an Australian sample: validating a new, generic health status measure. Aust J Public Health 19, 160166.
33.Byles J, Robinson I, Gibson R et al. (2007) Depression Among Women in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. Newcastle: Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle.
34.Silveira E, Taft C, Sundh V et al. (2005) Performance of the SF-36 Health Survey in screening for depressive and anxiety disorders in an elderly female Swedish population. Qual Life Res 14, 12631274.
35.Berwick D, Murphy J, Goldman P et al. (1991) Performance of a 5-item mental health screening test. Med Care 29, 169176.
36.Hure A, Young A, Smith R et al. (2009) Diet and pregnancy status in Australian women. Public Health Nutr 12, 853861.
37.World Health Organization (2006) WHO Global Database on Body Mass Index. Geneva: WHO.
38.Brown W & Bauman A (2000) Comparison of estimates of population levels of physical activity using two measures. Aust N Z J Public Health 24, 5255.
39.McLennan W & Podger A (1995) National Nutrition Survey, Selected Highlights, Australia. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Services.
40.Panagiotakos D, Mamplekou E, Pitsavos C et al. (2010) Fatty acid intake and depressive symptomatology in a Greek sample: an epidemiological analysis. J Am Coll Nutr 29, 586594.
41.Silvers K & Scott K (2002) Fish consumption and self-reported physical and mental health status. Public Health Nutr 5, 427431.
42.Burdge G & Wootton S (2002) Conversion of α-linolenic acid to eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in young women. Br J Nutr 88, 411420.
43.Pawlosky R, Hibbeln J, Novotny J et al. (2001) Physiological compartmental analysis of α-linolenic acid metabolism in adult humans. J Lipid Res 42, 12571265.
44.Burdge G (2004) α-Linolenic acid metabolism in men and women: nutritional and biological implications. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 7, 137144.
45.Burdge G & Calder P (2005) Conversion of α-linolenic acid to longer-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in human adults. Reprod Nutr Dev 45, 581597.
46.Yehuda S, Rabinovitz S & Mostofsky D (2005) Mixture of essential fatty acids lowers test anxiety. Nutr Neurosci 8, 265267.
47.Williams L, Kiecolt-Glaser J, Horrocks L et al. (1992) Quantitative association between altered esterified omega-6 fatty acid proportions and psychological stress. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 47, 165170.
48.Taylor A, Wilson D, Grande E et al. (1999) Mental health status of the South Australian population. Aust N Z J Public Health 24, 2934.
49.Australian Bureau of Statistics (1999) National Health Survey: Use of Medications, Australia, 1995. Catalogue no. 4377.0. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service.
50.Schachter H, Kourad K, Merali Z et al. (2005) Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Mental Health. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment no. 116. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and University of Ottawa Evidence-based Practice Center.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 11
Total number of PDF views: 92 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 306 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 19th October 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.