Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Validation and reproducibility of an FFQ for use among adults in Botswana

  • Maria D Jackson (a1), Boitumelo S Motswagole (a2), Lemogang D Kwape (a2), Rosemary I Kobue-Lekalake (a3), Tidimalo B Rakgantswana (a4), Tiyapo Mongwaketse (a3), Motlalepula Mokotedi (a2) and Jose Jackson-Malete (a5)...

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a 122-item interviewer-administered quantitative FFQ developed to determine food and nutrient intakes of adults in Botswana.

Design

Relative validity of the FFQ was evaluated by comparing nutrient and food group intakes against four non-consecutive 24 h recalls administered over 12 months. The FFQ was repeated after 1 year to assess reproducibility.

Setting

Kanye, Botswana.

Subjects

Seventy-nine adults aged 18–75 years.

Results

Spearman correlation coefficients for the validity of energy-adjusted nutrients ranged from 0·42 (carbohydrate) to 0·49 (protein) for macronutrients and from 0·23 (Fe) to 0·44 (PUFA) for micronutrients. Exact agreement of quartile distribution for nutrients between the FFQ and recalls ranged from 27 % to 72 %. Weighted kappa values were lowest for retinol (0·13), Fe (0·22) and β-carotene (0·25) and ranged from 0·33 (SFA) to 0·59 (folate) for other nutrients (energy, carbohydrate, protein, fat, Ca and vitamin E). Spearman correlation coefficients between the recalls and FFQ for food groups ranged from 0·18 (dark green leafy and yellow vegetables) to 0·58 (poultry). Reproducibility correlation coefficients (energy-adjusted) varied between 0·39 for retinol and 0·66 for vitamin E, with most values falling between 0·50 and 0·60.

Conclusions

The FFQ had good relative validity for estimating habitual food group and nutrient intakes, but was poor for some micronutrients (Fe, retinol and β-carotene) and foods (fruits and dark green leafy vegetables).

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Validation and reproducibility of an FFQ for use among adults in Botswana
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Validation and reproducibility of an FFQ for use among adults in Botswana
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Validation and reproducibility of an FFQ for use among adults in Botswana
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email maria.jackson@uwimona.edu.jm

References

Hide All
1.Livingston, J (2003) Pregnant children and half-dead adults: modern living and the quickening life cycle in Botswana. Bull Hist Med 77, 133162.
2.Beaglehole, R, Bonita, R, Horton, Ret al. (2011) Priority actions for the non-communicable disease crisis. Lancet 377, 14381447.
3.Willett, W (1990) Nutritional Epidemiology. New York: Oxford University Press.
4.MacIntyre, UE, Venter, CS & Vorster, HH (2001) A culture-sensitive quantitative food frequency questionnaire used in an African population: 2. Relative validation by 7-day weighted records and biomarkers. Public Health Nutr 4, 6371.
5.MacIntyre, UE, Venter, CS & Vorster, HH (2001) A culture-sensitive quantitative food frequency questionnaire used in an African population: 1. Development and reproducibility. Public Health Nutr 4, 5362.
6.Senekal, M, Steyn, NP & Nel, J (2009) A questionnaire for screening the micronutrient intake of economically active South African adults. Public Health Nutr 12, 21592167.
7.Parr, CL, Barikmo, I, Torheim, LEet al. (2002) Validation of the second version of a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire for use in Western Mali. Public Health Nutr 5, 769781.
8.Torheim, LE, Barikmo, I, Hatloy, Aet al. (2001) Validation of a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire for use in Western Mali. Public Health Nutr 4, 12671277.
9.Sharma, S, Cade, J, Jackson, Met al. (1996) Development of food frequency questionnaires in three population samples of African origin from Cameroon, Jamaica and Caribbean migrants to the UK. Eur J Clin Nutr 50, 479486.
10.Cassidy, CM (1994) Walk a mile in my shoes: culturally sensitive food-habit research. Am J Clin Nutr 59, 1 Suppl., 190S197S.
11.Medical Research Council of South Africa (2002) Diet Analysis and Nutrient Evaluation. FoodFinder 3 for Windows ®. Cape Town: MRC.
12.Horn-Ross, PL, Lee, VS, Collins, CNet al. (2008) Dietary assessment in the California Teachers Study: reproducibility and validity. Cancer Causes Control 19, 595603.
13.Jackson, M, Walker, S, Cade, Jet al. (2001) Reproducibility and validity of a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire among Jamaicans of African origin. Public Health Nutr 4, 971980.
14.Jackson, MD, Walker, SP, Younger, NMet al. (2011) Use of a food frequency questionnaire to assess diets of Jamaican adults: validation and correlation with biomarkers. Nutr J 10, 28.
15.Johansson, I, Hallmans, G, Wikman, Aet al. (2002) Validation and calibration of food-frequency questionnaire measurements in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease cohort. Public Health Nutr 5, 487496.
16.Marks, GC, Hughes, MC & van der Pols, JC (2006) Relative validity of food intake estimates using a food frequency questionnaire is associated with sex, age, and other personal characteristics. J Nutr 136, 459465.
17.Larkin, FA, Metzner, HL, Thompson, FEet al. (1989) Comparison of estimated nutrient intakes by food frequency and dietary records in adults. J Am Diet Assoc 89, 215223.
18.Rodriguez, MM, Mendez, H, Torun, Bet al. (2002) Validation of a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire for use among adults in Guatemala. Public Health Nutr 5, 691699.
19.Bohlscheid-Thomas, S, Hoting, I, Boeing, Het al. (1997) Reproducibility and relative validity of food group intake in a food frequency questionnaire developed for the German part of the EPIC project. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Int J Epidemiol 26, Suppl. 1, S59S70.
20.Feskanich, D, Rimm, EB, Giovannucci, ELet al. (1993) Reproducibility and validity of food intake measurements from a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. J Am Diet Assoc 93, 790796.
21.Malekshah, AF, Kimiagar, M, Saadatian-Elahi, Met al. (2006) Validity and reliability of a new food frequency questionnaire compared to 24 h recalls and biochemical measurements: pilot phase of Golestan cohort study of esophageal cancer. Eur J Clin Nutr 60, 971977.
22.Rimm, EB, Giovannucci, EL, Stampfer, MJet al. (1992) Reproducibility and validity of an expanded self-administered semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire among male health professionals. Am J Epidemiol 135, 11141126.
23.Cade, J, Thompson, R, Burley, Vet al. (2002) Development, validation and utilisation of food-frequency questionnaires – a review. Public Health Nutr 5, 567587.
24.Masson, LF, McNeill, G, Tomany, JOet al. (2003) Statistical approaches for assessing the relative validity of a food-frequency questionnaire: use of correlation coefficients and the kappa statistic. Public Health Nutr 6, 313321.
25.Villegas, R, Yang, G, Liu, Det al. (2007) Validity and reproducibility of the food-frequency questionnaire used in the Shanghai men's health study. Br J Nutr 97, 9931000.
26.Subar, AF, Kipnis, V, Troiano, RPet al. (2003) Using intake biomarkers to evaluate the extent of dietary misreporting in a large sample of adults: the OPEN study. Am J Epidemiol 158, 113.
27.Black, AE, Goldberg, GR, Jebb, SAet al. (1991) Critical evaluation of energy intake data using fundamental principles of energy physiology: 2. Evaluating the results of published surveys. Eur J Clin Nutr 45, 583599.

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Validation and reproducibility of an FFQ for use among adults in Botswana

  • Maria D Jackson (a1), Boitumelo S Motswagole (a2), Lemogang D Kwape (a2), Rosemary I Kobue-Lekalake (a3), Tidimalo B Rakgantswana (a4), Tiyapo Mongwaketse (a3), Motlalepula Mokotedi (a2) and Jose Jackson-Malete (a5)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.