Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Where has all the chocolate gone? A national survey assesses the effects of recent legislation to improve the nutritional quality of English secondary-school vending

  • Anne Matthews (a1), Michael Nelson (a2) (a3), Asha Kaur (a1), Mike Rayner (a1), Paul Kelly (a1) and Gill Cowburn (a1)...
Abstract
Objective

Obesity levels are rising in almost all parts of the world, including the UK. School food offers children in Great Britain between 25 % and 33 % of their total daily energy, with vending typically offering products high in fat, salt or sugar. Government legislation of 2007 to improve the quality of school food now restricts what English schools can vend. In assessing the effect of this legislation on the quality of English secondary-school vending provision, the response of schools to these effects is explored through qualitative data.

Design

A longitudinal postal and visit-based inventory survey of schools collected vending data during the academic year 2006–2007 (pre-legislation), 2007–2008 and 2008–2009 (both post-legislation). Interviews with school staff explored issues of compliance. Product categorisation and analysis were carried out by product type, nutrient profiling and by categories of foods allowed or prohibited by the legislation.

Setting

English secondary schools.

Subjects

A representative sample of 279 schools including sixty-two researcher-visited inventory schools participated in the research.

Results

School vending seems to have moved towards compliance with the new standards – now drinks vending predominates and is largely compliant, whereas food vending is significantly reduced and is mostly non-compliant. Sixth form vending takes a disproportionate share of non-compliance. Vending has declined overall, as some schools now perceive food vending as uneconomic. Schools adopting a ‘whole-school’ approach appeared the most successful in implementing the new standards.

Conclusions

Government legislation has achieved significant change towards improving the quality of English school vending, with the unintended consequence of reducing provision.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Where has all the chocolate gone? A national survey assesses the effects of recent legislation to improve the nutritional quality of English secondary-school vending
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Where has all the chocolate gone? A national survey assesses the effects of recent legislation to improve the nutritional quality of English secondary-school vending
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Where has all the chocolate gone? A national survey assesses the effects of recent legislation to improve the nutritional quality of English secondary-school vending
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email anne.matthews@dphpc.ox.ac.uk
References
Hide All
1.Wang, Y & Lobstein, T (2006) Worldwide trends in childhood overweight and obesity. Int J Pediatr Obes 1, 1125.
2.NHS Information Centre (2006) Health Survey for England 2008 Trend Tables. London: NHS Information Centre.
3.Campbell, K, Waters, E, O'Meara, S et al. (2001) Interventions for preventing obesity in childhood: a systematic review. Obes Rev 2, 149157.
4.Department of Health (2000) National Diet and Nutrition Survey of Young People Aged 4 to 18 Years. London: The Stationery Office.
5.Gustafsson, U (2002) School meals policy: the problem with governing children. Soc Policy Admin 36, 685698.
6.Caroline Walker Trust (1992) Nutritional Guidelines for School Meals. Report of an Expert Working Group. London: Caroline Walker Trust.
7.Department for Education and Employment (1997) Excellence in Schools. London: Department for Education and Employment.
8.Statutory Instrument 2000 No. 1777 (2000) Education (Nutritional Standards for School Lunches) (England) Regulations 2000. London: The Stationery Office.
9.Nelson, M, Bradbury, J, Poulter, J et al. (2004) School Meals in Secondary Schools in England. Nottingham: DfES.
10.Nelson, M, Lowes, K & Hwang, V (2007) The contribution of school meals to food consumption and nutrient intakes of young people aged 4–18 years in England. Public Health Nutr 10, 652662.
11.French, SA, Story, M, Fulkerson, J et al. (2003) Food environment in secondary schools: a la carte, vending machines, and food policies and practices. Am J Public Health 93, 11611167.
12.Matthews, A, Devi, A & Rayner, M (2006) Survey of Vending in Oxfordshire Secondary Schools. Oxford: British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group.
13.Hutchinson, J, Brown, N & Gilmore, S (1998) High school student perceptions associated with their participation in the National School Lunch Program. J Child Nutr Manag 22, 8794.
14.Lobstein, T, Baur, L & Uauy, R (2004) Obesity in children and young people: a crisis in public health. Report to the World Health Organization by the International Obesity TaskForce. Obes Rev 5, Suppl. 1, 5104.
15.Health Education Trust (2004) Vending Healthy Drinks: A Guide for Schools. London: Food Standards Agency.
16.Department of Health (2004) Choosing Health: Making More Healthy Choices Easier. London: Department of Health.
17.Department of Health (2005) Choosing a Better Diet: A Food and Health Action Plan. London: Department of Health.
18.Statutory Instrument 2000 No. 2359 (2007) Education (Nutritional Standards for School Lunches) (England) Regulations 2007. London: The Stationery Office.
19.School Food Trust (2007) Revised Guide to Standards for School Lunches. London: School Food Trust.
20.School Food Trust (2007) Guide to the New Food-Based Standards for Food Other than Lunches. London: School Food Trust.
21.Food Standards Agency & Institute of Food Research (2002) McCance and Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 6th ed. Cambridge: Food Standards Agency and Institute of Food Research.
22.Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (1990) Food Portion Sizes, 2nd ed. London: HMSO.
23.Unwin I (2000) Eurocode 2 version 99/2. http://www.ianunwin.demon.co.uk/eurocode/project/ecproject.htm (accessed June 2009).
24.Rayner, M, Scarborough, P, Boxer, A et al. (2005) Nutrient Profiles: Development of Final Model. London: Food Standards Agency.
25.Taylor, S & Bogdan, R (1998) Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods: A Guidebook and Resource. New York: John Wiley & Sons.
26.Lister-Sharp, D, Chapman, S, Stewart-Brown, S et al. (1999) Health promoting schools and health promotion in schools: two systematic reviews. Health Technol Assess 3, 1207.
27.Sinclair, S & Winkler, J (2008) The School Fringe: What Pupils Buy and Eat From Shops Surrounding Secondary Schools. London: London Metropolitan University.
28.School Food Trust (2007) A Fresh Look at Vending in Schools. London: School Food Trust.
29.Sharma, M (2006) International school-based interventions for preventing obesity in children. Obes Rev 8, 155167.
30.Story, M, Nanney, M & Schwartz, B (2009) Schools and obesity prevention: creating school environments and policies to promote healthy eating and physical activity. Milbank Q 87, 71100.
31.Swinburn, B (2008) Obesity prevention: the role of policies, laws and regulations. Aust N Z Health Policy 5, 12. doi: 10.1186/1743-8462-5-12
32.The parents Jury (2010) School Nutrition Guidelines Around Australia. http://www.parentsjury.org.au/tpj_browse.asp?ContainerID=tpj_school_nutrition_guidelines (accessed October 2010).
33.Nollen, N, Befort, C, Snow, P et al. (2007) The school food environment and adolescent obesity: qualitative insights from high school principals and food service personnel. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 4, 18. doi:10.1186/1479-5868-4-18
34.Nutbeam, D (1992) The health promoting school: closing the gap between theory and practice. Health Promot Int 7, 151153.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed