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Minimum limiting deglacial ages for the out-of-phase Saginaw Lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon methods

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

Timothy G. Fisher*
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Mail Stop #604, 2801 West Bancroft St., Toledo, Ohio43606, USA
Mitchell R. Dziekan
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Mail Stop #604, 2801 West Bancroft St., Toledo, Ohio43606, USA DTE Energy, One Energy Plaza, 410 GO, Detroit, Michigan48226, USA
Jennifer McDonald
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Mail Stop #604, 2801 West Bancroft St., Toledo, Ohio43606, USA Minnesota Geological Survey, University of Minnesota, 2609 Territorial Road, St. Paul, Minnesota55114, USA
Kenneth Lepper
Affiliation:
Department of Geosciences, Optical Dating and Dosimetry Lab, North Dakota State University, P.O. Box 6050, Fargo, North Dakota58108, USA
Henry M. Loope
Affiliation:
Indiana Geological and Water Survey, Indiana University Bloomington, 611 N. Walnut Grove Bloomington, Indiana47405, USA
Francine M.G. McCarthy
Affiliation:
Department of Earth Sciences, Brock University, Brock Ontario, 1812 Sir Isaac Brock Way, St. Catharines, OntarioL2S 3A1, Canada
B. Brandon Curry
Affiliation:
Illinois State Geological Survey, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 615 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign, Illinois61820, USA
*
*Corresponding author at: Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Mail Stop #604, 2801 West Bancroft St., Toledo, Ohio43606, USA. E-mail address: timothy.fisher@utoledo.edu (T.G. Fisher)

Abstract

Twenty-four new optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon ages from sediment cores in nine lakes associated with the Shipshewana and Sturgis moraines in northern Indiana and southern Michigan estimate when recession of the Saginaw Lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet was underway in the southern Great Lakes region, USA. Average OSL ages of 23.4 ± 2.2 ka for the Shipshewana Moraine and 19.7 ± 2.2 ka for the Sturgis Moraine are considered minimum limiting deglacial ages for these recessional moraines. The much younger radiocarbon ages are consistent with other regional radiocarbon ages from lakes, and record climate amelioration around ~16.5 cal ka BP. Early recession of the interlobate Saginaw Lobe was well underway by 23.4 ± 2.2 ka, when the adjacent Lake Michigan and Huron-Erie lobes were a few hundred kilometers farther south and near their maximum southerly limits. The results provide the first time constraints when sediment from the Lake Michigan and Huron-Erie lobes began filling the accommodation space left by the Saginaw Lobe. The difference between the oldest radiocarbon and OSL age is 7400 yr for the Shipshewana Moraine and 3400 yr for the Sturgis Moraine.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © University of Washington. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2020

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Minimum limiting deglacial ages for the out-of-phase Saginaw Lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon methods
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Minimum limiting deglacial ages for the out-of-phase Saginaw Lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon methods
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