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Development of a scale to measure learners’ perceived preferences and benefits of data-driven learning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 November 2015

Atsushi Mizumoto
Affiliation:
Kansai University, Japan (mizumoto@kansai-u.ac.jp)
Kiyomi Chujo
Affiliation:
Nihon University, Japan (chuujou.kiyomi@nihon-u.ac.jp)
Kenji Yokota
Affiliation:
Nihon UniversityJapan (yokota.kenji@nihon-u.ac.jp)

Abstract

In spite of researchers’ and practitioners’ increasing attention to data-driven learning (DDL) and increasing numbers of DDL studies, a multi-item scale to measure learners’ attitude toward DDL has not been developed thus far. In the present study, we developed and validated a psychometric scale to measure learners’ perceived preferences and benefits of DDL for research and pedagogical purposes. First, we created an item pool by referring to open-ended responses from learners; second, the items were pilot tested with target-level learners of English as a foreign language; and third, with item analyses and exploratory factor analysis, the revised version of the questionnaire was prepared. Finally, the questionnaire was administered, and its psychometric properties were examined with confirmatory factor analysis and fit indices. The final phase also included a measure of task values to explore the convergent evidence of the construct validity of the proposed scale. The results suggest that the scale is a valid measure of learners’ attitudes toward DDL, with the hypothesized model providing a good fit with the data. We propose that the scale can be used in future studies that utilize the same type of questionnaire research to facilitate further investigation of DDL. Suggestions for further research are also provided.

Type
Regular papers
Copyright
Copyright © European Association for Computer Assisted Language Learning 2015 

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