Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-8hm5d Total loading time: 0.226 Render date: 2022-05-28T03:39:59.165Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

The proper object of non-doxastic religion: why traditional religion should be preferred over Schellenberg's simple ultimism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 May 2018

CARL-JOHAN PALMQVIST*
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, University of Lund, Box 192, 221 00, Lund, Sweden

Abstract

Taking for granted the view that belief-less, ‘non-doxastic’, engagement with religion is possible, this article discusses the proper object of such religiosity. Its focus is the claim of J. L. Schellenberg that non-doxastic religion should be directed at ’simple ultimism’. I argue that ‘simple ultimism’ is too abstract to allow for alignment with religious reality. Traditional religion is a better choice since it commonly contains religious experience. As long as the veridicality of such experience remains an epistemic possibility, it should guide our non-doxastic commitment. Objections commonly raised against reliance on religious experience become irrelevant on a non-doxastic approach.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Audi, Robert (2011) Rationality and Religious Commitment (Oxford: Oxford University Press).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alston, William P. (1993) Perceiving God (Ithaca: Cornell University Press).Google Scholar
Alston, William P. (1996) ‘Belief, acceptance and religious faith’, in Jordan, Jeff & Howard-Snyder, Daniel (eds) Faith, Freedom and Rationality (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.), 328.Google Scholar
Dole, Andrew (2013) ‘Is sceptical religion adequate as religion?Religious Studies, 49, 235248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Elliott, James (2017) ‘The power of humility in sceptical religion’, Religious Studies, 53, 97116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Franks Davis, Caroline (1989) The Evidential Force of Religious Experience (Oxford: Clarendon).Google Scholar
Howard-Snyder, Daniel (2016) ‘Does faith entail belief?’, Faith and Philosophy, 33, 142162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kwan, Kai-Man (2012) ‘The argument from religious experience’, in Lane Craig, William & Moreland, J. P. (eds) The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell), 498552.Google Scholar
Levi, Isaac (1967) Gambling with Truth (Cambridge MA: MIT Press).Google Scholar
Mckaughan, Daniel (2016) ‘Action-centered faith, doubt and rationality’, Journal of Philosophical Research, 41, 7190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Muyskens, James L. (1979) The Sufficiency of Hope (Philadelphia: Temple University Press).Google Scholar
Pojman, Louis (1986) ‘Faith without belief’, Faith and Philosophy, 3, 157176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rotschaefer, William A. (2016) ‘Schellenberg's evolutionary religion: how evolutionary and how religious?’, Religious Studies, 52, 475496.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schellenberg, J. L. (2005) Prolegomena to a Philosophy of Religion (Ithaca: Cornell University Press).Google Scholar
Schellenberg, J. L. (2007) The Wisdom to Doubt (Ithaca: Cornell University Press).Google Scholar
Schellenberg, J. L. (2009) The Will to Imagine (Ithaca: Cornell University Press).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schellenberg, J. L. (2013) Evolutionary Religion (Oxford: Oxford University Press).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Swinburne, Richard (2004) The Existence of God, 2nd edn (Oxford: Oxford University Press).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yandell, Keith E. (1993) The Epistemology of Religious Experience (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Google Scholar
5
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The proper object of non-doxastic religion: why traditional religion should be preferred over Schellenberg's simple ultimism
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The proper object of non-doxastic religion: why traditional religion should be preferred over Schellenberg's simple ultimism
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The proper object of non-doxastic religion: why traditional religion should be preferred over Schellenberg's simple ultimism
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *