Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Problems for moral/natural supervenience

  • DAVID E. ALEXANDER (a1)

Abstract

‘Everyone agrees that the moral features of things supervene on their natural features’ (Smith (1994), 22). Everyone is wrong, or so I will argue. In the first section, I explain the version of moral supervenience that Smith and others argue everyone should accept. In the second section, I argue that the mere conceptual possibility of a divine command theory of morality (DCT) is sufficient to refute the version of moral supervenience under consideration. Lastly, I consider and respond to two objections, showing, among other things, that while DCT is sufficient to refute this version of moral supervenience it is not necessary.

Copyright

References

Hide All
Kim, J. (1989) ‘The myth of nonreductive materialism, Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association, 63, 3147.
Loux, M. (2002) Metaphysics: A Contemporary Introduction (New York NY: Routledge).
Menzel, C. (1991) ‘Temporal actualism and singular foreknowledge’, in Tomberlin, J. (ed.) Philosophical Perspectives, V, Philosophy of Religion (Atascadero CA: Ridgeway Publishing), 475507.
Miller, A. (2003) An Introduction to Contemporary Metaethics (Cambridge MA: Polity Press).
Quinn, P. (2005) ‘Theological voluntarism’, in Copp, D. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 6390.
Shafer-Landau, R. (2003) Moral Realism: A Defence (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
Smith, M. (1994) The Moral Problem (Oxford: Blackwell).
Smith, M. (2004) ‘Does the evaluative supervene on the natural?, in idem Ethics and the A Priori: Selected Essays on Moral Psychology and Meta-Ethics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Zangwill, N. (2005) ‘Moore, morality, supervenience, essence, epistemology’, American Philosophical Quarterly, 42, 125130.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed