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Farmer use of intermediated market channels: a review

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 April 2018

Carolyn Dimitri*
Affiliation:
New York University, New York, NY, USA
Karen Gardner
Affiliation:
New York University, New York, NY, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Carolyn Dimitri, E-mail: carolyn.dimitri@nyu.edu

Abstract

Intermediated markets are relatively new market channels that have the potential to expand local and regional food systems while increasing the viability of small- and medium-sized farms. The intermediated channels comprise a short supply chain linking farmers with consumers through the use of intermediary such as a distributor or supermarket. In many instances, these supply chains embed social or environmental values, such as supporting local farming. In this paper, we examine the current state of knowledge about the intermediated market channel. The first source of knowledge consists of data from federal and private sources. Next, we review a selection of the published literature focusing on farmer use of intermediated market channels in the USA. The main intermediated channels include direct to institutions, such as schools and hospitals; food hubs; and direct to retail. The paper finishes by raising questions about future of intermediated markets, based on the findings of the literature review and data.

Type
Themed Content: Intermediated Marketing Channels in Regional Food Systems
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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