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  • Cited by 9
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    D’Ambruoso, William L. 2015. Norms, perverse effects, and torture. International Theory, Vol. 7, Issue. 01, p. 33.


    Kearns, Erin 2014. The Study of Torture: Why It Persists, Why Perceptions of It are Malleable, and Why It is Difficult to Eradicate. Laws, Vol. 4, Issue. 1, p. 1.


    Mayer, Jeremy D. Koizumi, Naoru and Malik, Ammar Anees 2014. Examining Torture.


    Mavronicola, Natasa and Messineo, Francesco 2013. Relatively Absolute? The Undermining of Article 3 ECHR inAhmadvUK. The Modern Law Review, Vol. 76, Issue. 3, p. 589.


    Mumford, Andrew 2012. MINIMUM FORCE MEETS BRUTALITY: DETENTION, INTERROGATION AND TORTURE IN BRITISH COUNTER-INSURGENCY CAMPAIGNS. Journal of Military Ethics, Vol. 11, Issue. 1, p. 10.


    Blakeley, Ruth 2011. Dirty Hands, Clean Conscience? The CIA Inspector General's Investigation of “Enhanced Interrogation Techniques” in the War on Terror and the Torture Debate. Journal of Human Rights, Vol. 10, Issue. 4, p. 544.


    Blakeley, Ruth 2010. Liberal democracies and the globalisation of state terrorism in the 21st century. Critical Studies on Terrorism, Vol. 3, Issue. 2, p. 169.


    Blakeley, Ruth 2008. The elephant in the room: a response to John Horganand Michael J. Boyle. Critical Studies on Terrorism, Vol. 1, Issue. 2, p. 151.


    Breen Smyth, Marie Gunning, Jeroen Jackson, Richard Kassimeris, George and Robinson, Piers 2008. Editors’ Introduction: negotiating stormy waters. Critical Studies on Terrorism, Vol. 1, Issue. 2, p. 145.


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Why torture?

Abstract
ABSTRACT

I develop a framework to account for torture, which I argue should be understood with reference to international relations. I show that torture is intended as a tool to ensure the security, stability and legitimacy of elites, often transnationally, but there is often a disjuncture between its intended and actual outcomes. Despite dominant claims that torture is used to defeat security threats, most torture is intended to deter political opposition and secure legitimacy for elites. I conclude that torture should be renounced, both on moral grounds, and because it is not necessary for the functions it is intended to serve.

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Review of International Studies
  • ISSN: 0260-2105
  • EISSN: 1469-9044
  • URL: /core/journals/review-of-international-studies
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