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Dynamic multi-priority control in redundant robotic systems1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 May 2013

Hamid Sadeghian*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology (IUT), Isfahan 84156-83111, Iran PRISMA Lab, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica e Tecnologie dell'Informazione, Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy
Luigi Villani
Affiliation:
PRISMA Lab, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica e Tecnologie dell'Informazione, Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy
Mehdi Keshmiri
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology (IUT), Isfahan 84156-83111, Iran
Bruno Siciliano
Affiliation:
PRISMA Lab, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica e Tecnologie dell'Informazione, Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: h.sadeghian@me.iut.ac.ir

Summary

This paper presents a dynamic-level control algorithm to meet simultaneously multiple desired tasks based on allocated priorities for redundant robotic systems. It is shown that this algorithm can be treated as a general framework to achieve control over the whole body of the robot. The control law is an extension of the well-known acceleration-based control to the redundant robots, and considers also possible interactions with the environment occurring at any point of the robot body. The stability of this algorithm is shown and some of the previously developed results are formulated using this approach. To handle the interaction on robot body, null space impedance control is developed within the multi-priority framework. The effectiveness of the proposed approaches is evaluated by means of computer simulation.

Type
Articles
Information
Robotica , Volume 31 , Issue 7 , October 2013 , pp. 1155 - 1167
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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Footnotes

1

A preliminary version of this paper appeared in the proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2011.

References

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