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A fresh insight into Kane's equations of motion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2015

H. Nejat Pishkenari*
Affiliation:
Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran
S. A. Yousefsani
Affiliation:
Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran
A. L. Gaskarimahalle
Affiliation:
Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran
S. B. G. Oskouei
Affiliation:
Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: nejat@sharif.edu

Summary

With rapid development of methods for dynamic systems modeling, those with less computation effort are becoming increasingly attractive for different applications. This paper introduces a new form of Kane's equations expressed in the matrix notation. The proposed form can efficiently lead to equations of motion of multi-body dynamic systems particularly those exposed to large number of nonholonomic constraints. This approach can be used in a recursive manner resulting in governing equations with considerably less computational operations. In addition to classic equations of motion, an efficient matrix form of impulse Kane formulations is derived for systems exposed to impulsive forces.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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