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Robotic grasping of complex shapes: is full geometrical knowledge of the shape really necessary?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2009

M. A. Rodrigues
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, The University of Wales, Aberystwyth SY233DB, Wales (UK)
Y. E. Li
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, The University of Wales, Aberystwyth SY233DB, Wales (UK)
M. H. Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, The University of Wales, Aberystwyth SY233DB, Wales (UK)
J. J. Rowland
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, The University of Wales, Aberystwyth SY233DB, Wales (UK)

Summary

This paper aims at contributing to a sub-symbolic, feedback-based “theory of robotic grasping” where no full geometrical knowledge of the shape is assumed. We describe experimental results on grasping 2D generic shapes without traditional geometrical processing. Grasping algorithms are used in conjunction with a vision system and a robot manipulator with a three-fingered gripper is used to grasp several different shapes. The altorithms are run on the shape as it appears on the computer screen (i.e. directly from a vision system). Simulated gripper ringer with virtual sensors are configured and positioned on the screen whose inputs are controlled by moving their position relative to the image until an equilibrium is reached among the control systems involved.

Type
Articles
Information
Robotica , Volume 13 , Issue 5 , September 1995 , pp. 499 - 506
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

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References

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