Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-x64cq Total loading time: 0.18 Render date: 2022-05-20T18:25:16.446Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Article contents

Tendon sheath analysis for estimation of distal end force and elongation for sensorless distal end

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2010

S. J. Phee*
Affiliation:
Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Ave, Singapore639798
S. C. Low
Affiliation:
Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Ave, Singapore639798
P. Dario
Affiliation:
Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, CRIM
A. Menciassi
Affiliation:
Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, CRIM
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: msjphee@ntu.edu.sg

Summary

Tendon sheath actuation is found in many applications, particularly in robotic hands and surgical robots. Due to the friction between the tendon and sheath, many undesirable characteristic such as backlash, hysteresis and non-linearity are present. It is desirable to know the end-effector force and elongation of the tendon to control the system effectively, but it is not always feasible to fix sensors at the end effector. A method to estimate the end-effector parameters using only a force and position sensor at the proximal site is given. An analytical study is presented and experiments are reported to support the result, showing a maximum full-scale error of approximately 7%. This result is achieved if the shape of the sheath remains the same and buckling is negligible. The results presented in this study could contribute towards haptic development in robotics surgery.

Type
Article
Information
Robotica , Volume 28 , Issue 7 , December 2010 , pp. 1073 - 1082
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.Tavakoli, M., Patel, R. V. and Moallem, M., “Haptic interaction in robot-assisted endoscopic surgery: a sensorized end-effector,” Int. J. Med. Rob. Comp. Asst. Sur. 1 (2), 5363 (2005).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2.Mitsushi, M., Arata, J., Tanaka, K., Miyamoto, M., Yoshidome, T., Iwata, S., Warisawa, S. and Hashizume, M., “Development of a Remote Minimally-Invasive Surgical System with Operational Environment Transmission Capability,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Taipei, Taiwan (Sep. 2003).Google Scholar
3.Zemiti, N., Ortmaier, T., Vitrani, M. A. and Morel, G., “A force controlled laparoscopic surgical robot without distal force sensing,” Springer Tracts Adv. Robot. Exp. Robot. IX 21, 153163 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4.Phee, S. J., Low, S. C., Sun, Z. L., Ho, K. Y., Huang, W. M. and Thant, Z. M., “Robotic system for no-scar gastrointestinal surgery,” Int. J. Med. Rob. Comp. Asst. Sur. 4, 1522 (2008).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5.Abbott, D. J., Becke, C., Rothstein, R. I. and Peine, W. J., “Design of an Endoluminal NOTES Robotics System,” Proceedings IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, San Diego, CA (Nov. 2007).Google Scholar
6.Kaneko, M., Yamashita, T. and Tanie, K., “Basic Considerations for Tendon Drive Robots,” Intenational Conference on Advanced Robotics, Pisa, Italy (Jun. 1991).Google Scholar
7.Kaneko, M., Wada, M., Maekawa, H. and Tanie, K., “A New Consideration on Tendon-Tension Control of Tendon-Driven Robot Hand,” Proceedings IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Sacramento, CA (Apr. 1991).Google Scholar
8.Kaneko, M., Paetsch, W. and Tolle, H., “Input-dependent stability of joint torque control of tendon-driven robot hands,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron. 2, 10571062 (Apr. 1992).Google Scholar
9.Palli, G. and Melchiorri, C., “Model and Control of Tendon-Sheath Transmission Systems,” Proceedings IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Orlando, FL (May 2006).Google Scholar
10.Agrawal, V., Peine, W. J. and Yao, B., “Modeling of a Closed Loop Cable-Conduit Transmission System,” IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Pasadena, CA (May 2008).Google Scholar
11.Guckert, M. L. and Naish, M. D., “Measuring the Angle of a Rotating Link Through Compliant Driving Tendons,” Canadian Conference on Electrical and Computer Engineering, Niagara Falls, ON, Canada (May 2008).Google Scholar
51
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Tendon sheath analysis for estimation of distal end force and elongation for sensorless distal end
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Tendon sheath analysis for estimation of distal end force and elongation for sensorless distal end
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Tendon sheath analysis for estimation of distal end force and elongation for sensorless distal end
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *