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  • ISSN: 0956-7933 (Print), 1474-0656 (Online)
  • Editors: Dr Carl Griffin University of Sussex, UK , Professor Keith D. M. Snell University of Leicester, UK and Professor Tom Williamson University of East Anglia, UK
  • Editorial board
Rural History is well known as a stimulating forum for interdisciplinary exchange. Its definition of rural history ignores traditional subject boundaries to encourage the cross-fertilisation that is essential for an understanding of rural society. It stimulates original scholarship and provides access to the best of recent research. While concentrating on the English-speaking world and Europe, the journal is not limited in geographical coverage. Subject areas include: agricultural history; historical ecology; folklore; popular culture and religion; rural literature; landscape history, archaeology and material culture; vernacular architecture; ethnography, anthropology and rural sociology; the study of women in rural societies; relationships between the urban and the rural; and the politics of rural societies. The journal accommodates varying disciplinary reference systems, and publishes book reviews and review articles.

Featured articles




History blog

  • Why Revisit the Early Modern Canon?
  • 16 August 2018, Lisa Shapiro
  • The thing about canons is that they seem sacred. Challenging them, even revisiting them, can seem heretical. Facing these facts is the first step in addressing...
  • The Tudor banquet: digital text mining reveals new information
  • 14 August 2018, Louise Stewart
  • This blog accomapnies Louise Stewart’s Historical Journal article ‘Social Status and Classicism in the Visual and Material Culture of the Sweet Today, the term ‘banquet’ is commonly used to refer to any lavish feast.  However, in the Tudor and Stuart period the word had a different, and very specific meaning, referring to a separate meal which consisted solely of sweet foods.  In September 1591, for example, Queen Elizabeth I visited the Earl of Hertford at his estate at Elvetham.  The lavish entertainments provided for the queen during her four day stay included water pageants, fireworks, feasts and a glittering ‘banquet’.  A printed account of the entertainment makes it clear that this banquet was no ordinary meal.  It was served in the garden after supper, ‘all in glass and silver’ and accompanied by a spectacular fireworks display.  The queen was presented with a thousand sweet dishes including sculptural sugar work representing her arms, castles and forts, human figures and mythical and exotic animals as well as preserved fruits and other confections.  This elaborate spectacle was typical of the sweet banquet.…...