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Introduction: Emotion and the Sciences: Varieties of Empathy in Science, Art, and History

  • Susan Lanzoni (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0269889712000105
  • Published online: 24 July 2012
Abstract

Emotion and feeling have only in the last decade become analytic concepts in the humanities, reflected in what some have called an “affective turn” in the academy at large. The study of emotion has also found a place in science studies and the history and philosophy of science, accompanied by the recognition that even the history of objectivity depends in a dialectical fashion on a history of subjectivity (Daston and Galison 2010, esp. chap. 4). This topical issue is a contribution to this larger trend across the humanities and the history of science, and yet is circumscribed by attention to a particular kind of emotion or condition for feeling: one centered not in an individual body, but in the interstices between bodies and things, between selves and others – what we call empathy.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Zeynep Çelik Alexander . 2010Metrics of Experience: August Endell's Phenomenology of Architecture.” Grey Room (40):5083.

Patricia Ticento Clough and Jean Halley , eds. 2007. The Affective Turn: Theorizing the Social. Durham NC: Duke University Press.

Lorraine. Daston 1995. “Curiosity in Early Modern Science.” Word & Image 11 (4):391404.

Jean Decety and William Ickes , eds. 2009. The Social Neuroscience of Empathy. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Giuseppe Di Pellegrino , Luciano Fadiga , Leonardo Fogassi , Vittorio Gallese , and Giacomo Rizzolatti . 1992. “Understanding Motor Events: A Neurophysiological Study.” Experimental Brain Research 91:176180.

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Ruth Leys . 2011b. “II Affect and Intention: A Reply to William E. Connolly.” Critical Inquiry 37 (4):799805.

Charles S Myers . 1909. Text-Book of Experimental Psychology. London: Edward Arnold.

Tania Singer , Ben Seymour , John P. O'Dougherty , Klaas E. Stephan , Raymond J. Dolan , and Chris D. Frith . 2006. “Empathic Neural Responses Are Modulated by the Perceived Fairness of Others.” Nature 439:466469.

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Science in Context
  • ISSN: 0269-8897
  • EISSN: 1474-0664
  • URL: /core/journals/science-in-context
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