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Introduction: Science, Technology, Medicine – and the State: The Science-State Nexus in Scandinavia, 1850–1980

Abstract

One of the common characteristics of science, technology, and medicine is their ambition to epistemologically and organizationally move beyond the confines of nation states. In practice, however, they develop differently in countries or regions. Scientists, engineers, and physicians are constrained as well as enabled by national boundaries and specific cultures. The cultural status of such practices in reverse is influenced by a country's history, politics, and the view of the role of science, technology, and medicine in society. It is the relation between a specific region, Scandinavia, and the history of science, technology, and medicine within this region that this issue of Science in Context sets out to explore. But what is this “Scandinavia”? To many, Scandinavia besides being a specific geographical region of three countries (Denmark, Sweden, and Norway) with entwined histories and closely related languages is a way of denoting a specific style or movement. “Scandinavian design” is renowned for three interrelated features; minimalism or simplicity, functionalism, and “design to the people” i.e. functional products for the average citizen (Beer 1975; Glambek 1997; Fallan 2012).

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Kristin Asdal . 2008b. “Subjected to Parliament: The Laboratory of Experimental Medicine and the Animal Body.” Social Studies of Science 38:899917.

Eileene Harrison Beer . 1975. Scandinavian Design: Objects of a Life Style. New York: American-Scandinavian Foundation.

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Knut Sogner . 1997. “The Double Meaning of Vitamins.” Scandinavian Journal of History 22 (3):187198.

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Science in Context
  • ISSN: 0269-8897
  • EISSN: 1474-0664
  • URL: /core/journals/science-in-context
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