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Youthful minds and hands: Learning practical knowledge in early modern Europe

  • Feike Dietz (a1) and Sven Dupré (a1)
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Youthful minds and hands: Learning practical knowledge in early modern Europe

  • Feike Dietz (a1) and Sven Dupré (a1)

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