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Introduction: Family Minded Policy and Whole Family Practice – Developing a Critical Research Framework

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 September 2010

Harriet Clarke
Affiliation:
Institute of Applied Social Studies, School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham, UK E-mail: h.clarke@bham.ac.uk
Nathan Hughes
Affiliation:
Institute of Applied Social Studies, School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham, UK E-mail: n.j.hughes@bham.ac.uk

Extract

During the first decade of the twenty-first century, UK policy and practice has become increasingly overt in its concern with families. In January 2010, the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF, 2010) launched the Support for All: The Families and Relationships Green Paper. In its Foreword, Ed Balls, the then Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families, presented ‘Strong, stable families’ as ‘the bedrock of our society’, positioning the Green Paper as ‘supporting families to help themselves’, whilst ‘ensuring that all public services play their part in supporting strong and resilient family relationships’ (DCSF, 2010: 3). The Centre for Social Justice offered an immediate response with its own Green Paper on the Family, emphasising the role of ‘family breakdown’ as ‘the root’ of ‘pathways to poverty’ for many, as well as a barrier to appropriate childhood development and positive ‘future life outcomes’ (Centre for Social Justice, 2010: 4).

Type
Themed Section on Family Minded Policy and Whole Family Practice
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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References

Barn, R., Ladino, C. and Rogers, B. (2006), Parenting in Multi-Racial Britain, London: National Children's Bureau in association with Joseph Rowntree Foundation.Google Scholar
Centre for Social Justice (2010), Green Paper on the Family, London: Centre for Social Justice.Google Scholar
Department for Children, Schools and Families (2010), Support for All: The Families and Relationships Green Paper, London: The Stationery Office.Google Scholar
Dodds, A. (2009) ‘Families “at risk” and the Family Nurse Partnership: the intrusion of risk into social exclusion policy’, Journal of Social Policy, 38, 3, 499514.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morris, K., Hughes, N., Clarke, H., Tew, J., Mason, P., Galvani, S., Lewis, A., Loveless, L., Becker, S. and Burford, G. (2008), Think Family: A Literature Review of Whole Family Approaches, London: Cabinet Office.Google Scholar
Morris, K., Warren, S., Mason, P., Hek, R. and Plumridge, G. (2006), The Children's Fund and Black and Minority Ethnic Children, Birmingham: National Evaluation of the Children's Fund.Google Scholar
Social Exclusion Task Force (2008), Think Family: Improving the Life Chances of Families at Risk, London: Cabinet Office.Google Scholar
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