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Introduction: Welfare State Reform, Recognition and Emotional Labour

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 May 2013

Evelien Tonkens
Affiliation:
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Amsterdam E-mail: e.h.tonkens@uva.nl
Ellen Grootegoed
Affiliation:
Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research, University of Amsterdam E-mail: e.m.grootegoed@uva.nl
Jan Willem Duyvendak
Affiliation:
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Amsterdam E-mail: W.G.J.Duyvendak@uva.nl

Extract

Welfare state retrenchment and its corollary, the encouragement of ‘active citizenship’, are widespread phenomena in Western countries today. While public and academic debates have focused on the practical consequences of changing rules and shrinking entitlements, there has been much less attention on how citizens experience these reforms and their accompanying rhetoric. We know even less about how welfare reform impacts upon people's emotions. Such a focus, however, is important because the reform of the welfare state is about more than changing rights and duties. Reforms tell citizens what they are worth, how they are valued and judged, and how they are supposed to feel about the new arrangements.

Type
Themed Section on Welfare State Reform, Recognition and Emotional Labour
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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