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Working Together to Address Multiple Exclusion Homelessness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2011

Michelle Cornes
Affiliation:
Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London E-mail: michellecornes@aol.com
Louise Joly
Affiliation:
Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London E-mail: louise.joly@kcl.ac.uk
Jill Manthorpe
Affiliation:
Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London E-mail: jill.manthorpe@kcl.ac.uk
Sue O'Halloran
Affiliation:
School of Social Work and Applied Behavioural Studies, University of Cumbria E-mail: Sue.O'Halloran@Cumbria.ac.uk
Rob Smyth
Affiliation:
LookAhead Housing and Care E-mail: Robsmyth@lookahead.org.uk

Abstract

This article draws on preliminary findings from a two-year exploratory study to describe how different agencies and professionals work together to identify and manage the intersections between homelessness and other facets of deep social exclusion. We assess the extent to which current practice is informed by policy frameworks for ‘personalised and integrated care planning’ focusing in particular on the ‘coordinating’ and ‘sign-posting’ role of the housing support worker. We conclude with some initial thoughts as to how policy and practice might be strengthened in this area to ensure more ‘joined-up’ and continuous support for people with experience of multiple exclusion homelessness.

Type
Themed Section on Exploring Multiple Exclusion Homelessness
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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